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    #1

    down/over

    Is there subtle difference in the meaning between "1" and "2"?
    1. He was so drunk he fell down.
    2. He was so drunk he fell over.

  1. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: down/over

    I assume you tried to look it up first. If not, have a look here.

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: down/over

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    Is there subtle difference in the meaning between "1" and "2"?
    1. He was so drunk he fell down.
    2. He was so drunk he fell over.
    No, there is no practical difference as they stand. Each one could be extended to mean something different, "He fell down a well" or "He fell over a cliff", for example.

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    #4

    Re: down/over

    I think that fell over might sound a bit worse, like collapsing face down rather than losing balance.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: down/over

    There is a commonly-used phrase - "falling-down drunk" to describe a person who has had too much alcohol and who can barely stand up as a result.

    How was John last night?
    Oh, he was falling-down drunk! It was very funny.

    I don't think I've ever heard "falling-over drunk" used.

    Having said that, I see little difference, if any, between being so drunk that you fall down and being so drunk that you fall over.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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