Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 1,458
    #1

    fall in over your head

    "My first semester I took baby bio, baby chem, French, history, and baby philosophy," she says, explaining that before the term was over she found herself disavowing her I-want-to-be-a-doctor-speech to a new advisor. KC had a change of heart. Three-hour science labs, she discovered, didn’t really excite her. Nor did writing up lab reports. Not to mention that she felt in way over her head.
    Is the expression "fall in over your head" a variation on "be/get in over your head"? I couldn't find it used with "fall", but "be/get in over your head" makes sense in the context above.

    40 be/get in over your head to be or get involved in something that is too difficult for you to deal with : In business, start small and don’t get in over your head.


    Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English
    Thank you.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,590
    #2

    Re: fall in over your head

    Quote Originally Posted by Chicken Sandwich View Post
    Is the expression "fall in over your head" a variation on "be/get in over your head"? I couldn't find it used with "fall", but "be/get in over your head" makes sense in the context above.



    Thank you.
    The verb in the text is "feel", "feel, felt, felt", not "fall", "fall, fell, fallen".

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,590
    #3

    Re: fall in over your head

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The verb in the text is "feel", "feel, felt, felt", not "fall", "fall, fell, fallen".
    Not to be confused with the verb "to fell", "fell, felled, felled", or the adjective "fell".

  4. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 1,458
    #4

    Re: fall in over your head

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The verb in the text is "feel", "feel, felt, felt", not "fall", "fall, fell, fallen".
    Thank you for your pointing this out to me. So "to feel in way over her head" means the same as "to be/get in over your head" (since you didn't object to that earlier, I take it that they do mean the same, but just to be sure).

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,590
    #5

    Re: fall in over your head

    Quote Originally Posted by Chicken Sandwich View Post
    Thank you for your pointing this out to me. So "to feel in way over her head" means the same as "to be/get in over your head" (since you didn't object to that earlier, I take it that they do mean the same, but just to be sure).
    It doesn't mean exactly the same, it means that she felt like (sensed that) she was in over her head.

Similar Threads

  1. [Vocabulary] fall off versus fall over
    By virus99 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 27-Jun-2012, 01:02
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Oct-2009, 20:33
  3. fall vs fall down vs drop
    By ckcgordon in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-Jul-2009, 12:12
  4. Head and head back!!!
    By Mhd shaher in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-May-2009, 16:00
  5. wag his head = shake his head
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-Apr-2008, 11:13

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •