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  1. zoobinshid's Avatar
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    #1

    Exclamation Abandon!!!

    Hello everybody,
    Here is a sentence given by the Oxford Advance Dictionary as an example for the usage of(abandon).
    He gave the order to abandon ship.
    Now my question is that why we don`t have (the)between (abandon)and (ship).
    Thanks in advance,

  2. #2

    Re: Abandon!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by zoobinshid
    Hello everybody,
    Here is a sentence given by the Oxford Advance Dictionary as an example for the usage of(abandon).
    He gave the order to abandon ship.
    Now my question is that why we don`t have (the)between (abandon)and (ship).
    Thanks in advance,
    It's because we are not talking about any specific ship. Articles are oftentimes omitted in dictionary definitions when talking in general terms.


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    #3

    Re: Abandon!!!

    Sorry to disagree Marylin but we are talking about a VERY specific ship, it's the one that's SINKING!!!
    It's probably best to regard this as a fixed expression that doesn't take the article, no doubt it was omitted for brevity. The situation is somewhat urgent!
    Frank

  3. #4

    Re: Abandon!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Flittle
    Sorry to disagree Marylin but we are talking about a VERY specific ship, it's the one that's SINKING!!!
    It's probably best to regard this as a fixed expression that doesn't take the article, no doubt it was omitted for brevity. The situation is somewhat urgent!
    Frank
    Even though it is a fixed expression, the article is allowed between abandon and ship depending on context.

    http://www.google.com/search?as_q=&n...s=&safe=images

  4. SweetMommaSue's Avatar
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    #5

    Thumbs up Re: Abandon!!!

    Well, I must say, I never cease to learn in these forums! After nearly 10 years in the Navy, this is the first time I ever heard/saw the expression for abandoning ship with the definite article in it! I think they included it in those particular cases (from following your link, Marylin) because they were talkingabout the fact that the order was given. Whenever we had drills or spoke of it onboard ship, it was always "abandon ship"--no article. Therefore, I'm inclined to think that when one is in the situation, the expression is used without the article, but when one is relating a story about the situation, it may be included or omitted.

    Zoobinshid, great question! Let's see if we gain any more inputs!

    HAPPY NEW YEAR!

    Sweet Momma Sue

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    #6

    Re: Abandon!!!

    I think I understand what Marylin is saying about not refering to something specific. It seems that 'abandon ship' is acting more as a verb, or multi-word verb, such that the focus is on the action, rather than on the receiver of the action (the ship), even though there may be a ship present at the scene which will be receiving that action.

    Let's say I get a call at home from a friend who wants to go out. So I say, "I have to clean house today." How does this differ from "I have to clean the house today"? Again, I think there's slightly more emphasis on the action.

    Also compare 'chop wood' with 'chop the wood'.

    Maybe one of our grammarians can put the proper name to these verb-noun word sets.

  5. #7

    Re: Abandon!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Fizi
    I think I understand what Marylin is saying about not refering to something specific. It seems that 'abandon ship' is acting more as a verb, or multi-word verb, such that the focus is on the action, rather than on the receiver of the action (the ship), even though there may be a ship present at the scene which will be receiving that action.

    Let's say I get a call at home from a friend who wants to go out. So I say, "I have to clean house today." How does this differ from "I have to clean the house today"? Again, I think there's slightly more emphasis on the action.

    Also compare 'chop wood' with 'chop the wood'.

    Maybe one of our grammarians can put the proper name to these verb-noun word sets.

    I am not too sure what to make of it.
    I hope some big brains here will help us dispel our doubts we have about this issue. Mister M, Tdol, Cassy maybe, please?
    As for your "clean house" example, I wouldn't say " I have to clean house", if I mean actually cleaning the house with a mop and a broom. I would say I have to "clean house" if I wanted to fire all the employees working for me, I want to make a clean sweep and start all over ( because of corruption or whatever else).
    Clean house by itself is an idiomatic expression and takes on a totally different meaning.


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    #8

    Re: Abandon!!!

    I wouldn't put 'clean house' in the same category as 'abandon ship'. The former is a conscious twisting of grammar, while the latter is a standard phrase.

  6. zoobinshid's Avatar
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    #9

    Exclamation Re: Abandon!!!

    Well,so far so good.
    So you all agree that it`s a fixed expression or a conscious twisting of grammar.right?

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    #10

    Re: Abandon!!!

    No, not exactly!!
    'Clean house' is a twisting of grammar, 'abandon ship' is a fixed expression/standard phrase.
    Frank

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