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  1. moonlike's Avatar
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    #1

    off you go

    Hi
    Jenny: Thanks, I'd like that. And, er, thank you, Dr Lucas. It's been really helpful.
    Dr Lucas: I'm pleased. Right, off you go then.

    Does it mean it's time to go? Can we also make it like this, off she goes then/off they go then? Are there any other alternatives for it? or are there any other similar terms like that?
    Thanks a million.
    Being a non-native teacher, I'm so thrilled being in such a superb forum.

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: off you go

    Hi,

    Yes, it means 'it's time (for you) to go now.'

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #3

    Re: off you go

    It's the doctor's polite form of dismissal and yes it was time for Jenny to go; there was nothing more to be said and he had other patients waiting.

    'Then' here means 'in that case', and 'off' means 'away', so 'off you go then' means 'in that case you can go away'.

    You could say 'We checked our tickets and off we went to watch the beach volleyball'.

    Alternatives and similar terms:

    'I've nothing more to say; away you go.'

    'You're annoying me; be off with you!'

    'Up you get! You can't stay in bed all day'.

    Whether you use an exclamation mark or a full stop depends upon the loudness or urgency of the command, or the exasperation of the speaker.

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: off you go

    Perhaps it's worth noting, moonlike, that "off you go" doesn't always refer to "leaving" or "going away", it can also mean "start what you are about to do", "go about your business".

    a) I'd like to have another try at playing this difficult piece on the piano.
    b) Alright, off you go then, and I'll turn the pages of the sheet music for you.

    not a teacher

  3. moonlike's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: off you go

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It's the doctor's polite form of dismissal and yes – it was time for Jenny to go; there was nothing more to be said and he had other patients waiting.

    'Then' here means 'in that case', and 'off' means 'away', so 'off you go then' means 'in that case you can go away'.

    You could say 'We checked our tickets and off we went to watch the beach volleyball'.

    Alternatives and similar terms:

    'I've nothing more to say; away you go.'

    'You're annoying me; be off with you!'

    'Up you get! You can't stay in bed all day'.

    Whether you use an exclamation mark or a full stop depends upon the loudness or urgency of the command, or the exasperation of the speaker.

    Rover
    Thanks. I got it, I also use 'away with your books' or 'off with your mobile phones' in class. But I really found 'up you get' really interesting. Is there a special term form them?, or they have to be just memorized and they just come in the context of the conversation?

    Thanks a lot.
    Being a non-native teacher, I'm so thrilled being in such a superb forum.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: off you go

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlike View Post
    I also use 'away with your books' or 'off with your mobile phones' in class.
    These sound unnatural. It's 'Put your books away', which can be informally shortened to 'Books away' and 'Switch your mobile phones off'/'Phones off'.

  5. moonlike's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: off you go

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    These sound unnatural. It's 'Put your books away', which can be informally shortened to 'Books away' and 'Switch your mobile phones off'/'Phones off'.
    I learned them from "Practical classroom English", by Glyn Hughes and Josephine Moate with Tiina Raatikainen.
    Page 3, under a topic entitles "entering the classroom":
    Off with your coats.
    Out with your books.
    Away with your books/phones/MP3 players.
    Being a non-native teacher, I'm so thrilled being in such a superb forum.

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    #8

    Re: off you go

    They're possible, but they do sound a bit like 'Off with their heads' used by kings in historical drama.

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    #9

    Re: off you go

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    They're possible, but they do sound a bit like 'Off with their heads' used by kings in historical drama.
    ...and queens.
    Click image for larger version. 

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