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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    armor for field and tilt

    1. I can't get this structure, What does it mean?
    ex)Religion disarms death of its terror.

    2. Regretfully, I can't show you the picture of the armors displayed in Royal Ontario Museum in Canada. This is the description of the armors. What does "tilt" here mean?
    ex)armor for field and tilt
    kk44


  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: armor for field and tilt

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    1. I can't get this structure, What does it mean?
    ex)Religion disarms death of its terror. It takes away the terror/fear of death.

    2. Regretfully, I can't show you the picture of the armours displayed in Royal Ontario Museum in Canada. This is the description of the armours. What does "tilt" here mean?
    ex)armour for field and tilt
    kk44

    Have a look at this link:
    tilting (medieval sport) -- Britannica Online Encyclopedia

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: armor for field and tilt

    And I suppose, in this context, 'field' is shorthand for 'battlefield'.

    b
    Although I'm sure bhai's right about 1, 'of' in his paraphrase is potentially confusing (as there is an 'of' doing another job in the original - which might give the student the mistaken impression that bhai has just arbitrarily switched the words round to make sense!) The 'of' in the original goes with 'disarm'; and it's unusual (though not unknown) to use 'disarm of'; I would look askance at a sentence like 'He disarmed the intruder of his gun.'

  4. keannu's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: armor for field and tilt

    I also took this weird. This is from a book written by a Korean, and I don't know if he adopted this from another source, or he made it on his own. Definitely, your example "He disarmed the intruder of his gun" makes sense as does "The thief robbed the bank of thousands of dollars". In this case "of" refers to "removal" or "elimination".
    I think this could be revised to "Religion disarms the terror of death", where "of" just connects "the terror" and "death".

    ex)Religion disarms death of its terror

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    #5

    Re: armor for field and tilt

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    ex)Religion disarms death of its terror
    How about, "Religion deprives death of its terror"?


    PS:
    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    ...the picture of the armors... This is the description of the armors. [...]
    ex)armor for field and tilt
    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    ...the picture of the armours... This is the description of the armours. [...]
    ex)armour for field and tilt
    With all due respect, I would just like to point out that "armor" is the perfectly correct spelling of "armour" in American English.
    (Similar pairs are, for example, color/colour, parlor/parlour, honor/honour, etc. In all honesty, I find the American spelling more natural. *ducking my head down* )
    Dear native English speakers of this forum,
    Please, always point out my grammatical mistakes, assuming you have "the time and the inclination". That is really the most effective way for me to improve. Thank you very much.

    Please note that I am NOT an English teacher.

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: armor for field and tilt

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Mav~ View Post
    How about, "Religion deprives death of its terror"?


    PS:



    With all due respect, I would just like to point out that "armor" is the perfectly correct spelling of "armour" in American English.
    (Similar pairs are, for example, color/colour, parlor/parlour, honor/honour, etc. In all honesty, I find the American spelling more natural. *ducking my head down* )
    I was aware of the American difference in the spelling of "colour", "parlour" etcetera. I didn't know about "armour" but I suppose it's logical. Just out of interest which spelling system do students of English use in your country, British or American?

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    #7

    Re: armor for field and tilt

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Just out of interest which spelling system do students of English use in your country, British or American?
    I'm afraid I cannot answer this question; alas, it was long ago when I was a student. Back then, the most widely used dictionaries (I think it's safe to say the only English-Hungarian/Hungarian-English dictionaries) were those written by László Országh. (The Hungarian form of his name is Országh László.) I would have liked to give a link to an article on him, but I couldn't find any English article on this excellent scholar. Shame! László Országh (October 25, 1907—Januar 27, 1984) was a linguist, expert of history of literature and lexicographer. He finished his university studies at Rollins College, USA. Later in his career he was a master at University of Debrecen. In 1979, he was awarded with the Honorary Commander of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II for his role in spreading English language and culture.

    Now to the point. (I hope you didn't mind my little rambling about Mr. Országh.) The dictionaries (written by László Országh) we used favoured ( ) the British spelling for words like 'honour', 'colour', 'favour' (and 'armour' ), etc. (though the American spelling was also indicated), but followed the "-ize" spelling when it came to words like, 'apologize', 'privatize', 'organize', etc. It's either because of the time Mr. Országh had spent in the USA (but that wouldn't explain why he preferred the '-our' spelling), or it's because (according to Wikipedia ) he followed the Oxford spelling. ("The suffix -ize has been in use in the UK since the 16th century, and continues to be the spelling used in American English. Since the 1990s, -ise has become more common in the UK, with the result that -ize may be regarded incorrectly as an exclusively American variant.")

    Again, I don't know what they teach in schools nowadays. As for me, I use the British spelling when I write to a Briton (I hope it's correct, and not insulting in any way, to say 'Briton' ), and I prefer the American spelling when writing to an American, but sometimes, even then, I tend to use, 'colour', 'favourite', etc. Once I was 'corrected' by an American girl when I asked her to proofread a message of mine; she said, "It's fine as it is, but be sure to correct 'realise', because it's 'realize'. (She was a well-read, educated girl.) However, I have never been 'corrected' for '-our' spelling. (I assume nobody cares. I usually have to beg those very few native speakers I know to correct me. Their usual standpoint is, 'I understand what you mean.' But that's beside the point.)
    Dear native English speakers of this forum,
    Please, always point out my grammatical mistakes, assuming you have "the time and the inclination". That is really the most effective way for me to improve. Thank you very much.

    Please note that I am NOT an English teacher.

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    #8

    Re: armor for field and tilt

    Quote Originally Posted by ~Mav~ View Post
    (I hope it's correct, and not insulting in any way, to say 'Briton' )
    It's correct and not insulting, but not used much nowadays, but go ahead.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: armor for field and tilt

    We had a discussion about the appropriate noun for British people here. You may find it interesting - but not very conclusive.

  7. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: armor for field and tilt

    Do you have a reference for this:
    The suffix -ize has been in use in the UK since the 16th century, and continues to be the spelling used in American English. Since the 1990s, -ise has become more common in the UK, with the result that -ize may be regarded incorrectly as an exclusively American variant.
    It's what I've been saying for years, but a quote like this would give weight to my feeble 'I think that ...'

    b

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