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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Jun 2007
    • Posts: 1,271
    #1

    stovepiped

    What does "stovepiped" mean in the following context?

    He began his career as one of the creators of both Arpanet and the Ethernet, and knows what it takes to build something as vast as the World Wide Web. "In the early days, everything was stovepiped," he says. "Computing was done by IBM; communications was done by AT&T. Voice, video, and data were distinct services..."

    Thank you.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • American English
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      • United States
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      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #2

    Re: stovepiped

    A stovepipe is a long, narrow pipe. The idea is that there aren't any cross-connections. No one takes a comprehensive, across-the-board approach. Instead of you and I working together to do tasks A and B and maybe even C, I do A while you do B and someone else, who knows nothing about our progress, ideas, or challenges, does C.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #3

    Re: stovepiped

    Tha word 'stovepipe' was very popular in the IT world in the '80s (and possibly before - I just wasn't there). A similar idea, but referring a narrow (and potentially lengthy ) discussion, was 'rathole'.

    b

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