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    #1

    about tag question

    I really want to know if there is a difference between an invitation and an imperative sentence when making tag quesions?
    For example,
    Give me a hand, will you?
    Don't walk away, will you?
    Is it proper to say "Have some fruits, won't you?"

  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: about tag question

    NOT A TEACHER

    Quote Originally Posted by chance22 View Post
    Is it proper to say "Have some fruits, won't you?"
    I don't see why not. See also here Learning English | BBC World Service.

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    #3

    Re: about tag question

    Quote Originally Posted by chance22 View Post
    I really want to know if there is a difference between an invitation and an imperative sentence when making tag quesions?
    For example,
    Give me a hand, will you?
    Don't walk away, will you?
    The tone of voice determines whether it's a request or a command.

    The addition of 'please' would make it more of a request.

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: about tag question

    So, it seems there is no big difference between "...will you" and "..won't you"? In one book, it is said that when there is an invitation like asking sb to eat something, then "won't you" instead of "will you" should be used. Can I say this conclusion is actually not correct?

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: about tag question

    I find it a question of generation. My grandparents, when we arrived at their house for a family visit, would say "Have some tea, won't you?" or "I've made some cake. Have some, won't you?" I rarely hear anyone of a younger generation use this.

    The closest thing I can think of now is "Have some fruit, why don't you?" or the inverted "Why don't you have some fruit?" which is an invitation, not a question asking why the person has chosen not to eat fruit.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: about tag question

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I find it a question of generation. My grandparents, when we arrived at their house for a family visit, would say "Have some tea, won't you?" or "I've made some cake. Have some, won't you?" I rarely hear anyone of a younger generation use this.

    The closest thing I can think of now is "Have some fruit, why don't you?" or the inverted "Why don't you have some fruit?" which is an invitation, not a question asking why the person has chosen not to eat fruit.
    Hi emsr2d2,

    I wonder if the question tags are still commonly used by the younger generation nowadays, for example "It is cold, isn't it"?

    Thanks.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: about tag question

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Hi emsr2d2,

    I wonder if the question tags are still commonly used by the younger generation nowadays, for example "It is cold, isn't it"?

    Thanks.
    I can assure you that most question tags are still used by the vast majority of the population.

    As far as the younger generation is concerned, an irritating and common recent addition is adding "innit" to the end of almost any sentence. It's not a genuine question tag and it's frequently not even attached to a question.

    I was really drunk last night, innit.
    She's proper cool, innit.
    They've gone and got 'emselves nicked, innit.

    This word is usually used by people who have absolutely no concept of how to use the English language correctly, and frequently by people who use a lot of slang and street talk. My friends and I use it very sarcastically when we want to make it clear that the person we are talking about is the type of person who might use that word in everyday speech.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: about tag question

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I find it a question of generation. My grandparents, when we arrived at their house for a family visit, would say "Have some tea, won't you?" or "I've made some cake. Have some, won't you?" I rarely hear anyone of a younger generation use this.

    The closest thing I can think of now is "Have some fruit, why don't you?" or the inverted "Why don't you have some fruit?" which is an invitation, not a question asking why the person has chosen not to eat fruit.
    I didn't know it's used by older generation. Thank emsr2d2.

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    #9

    Re: about tag question

    Quote Originally Posted by chance22 View Post
    I didn't know it's used by older generation. Thank emsr2d2.
    I can only tell you my experience. Other people's families may never have used it or they might use it to this day.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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