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    #1

    I've forgotten or I forgot

    The following sentences are copied from Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English.

    1. I'm sorry, I've forgotten your name.
    2. I know you told me, but I forgot.

    If the above sentences to be changed as follows, are they correct?

    3. I'm sorry, I forgot your name.
    4. I'm sorry, I forget your name.
    5. I know you told me, but I've forgotten.
    6. I know you told me, but I forget.

    Thanks.

  1. SlickVic9000's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I've forgotten or I forgot

    (Not a Teacher)

    4 and 6 are wrong. The rest are good to go.

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    #3

    Re: I've forgotten or I forgot

    Colloquially, in BE, you'll often hear 'I forget' used like that.

    'I met Vic's sister yesterday. I forget her name'.

    It just means 'I can't remember her name'.



    Rover

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I've forgotten or I forgot

    "I've forgotten her name" to me means just that. The name has gone completely out of my head. In the same way, I have forgotten everything I learnt in biology lessons at school.

    "I forget her name" suggests a more temporary state. As Rover said, it is more similar to "I can't remember her name" but, to me, that could be followed by "at the moment". It leaves open the chance that I might remember it, possibly by the end of the conversation.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: I've forgotten or I forgot

    Is there any difference in meaning for the following questions?

    A: What is the title of the TV programme you watched last night?
    B: Oh, I forget.
    B: Oh, I forgot.
    B: Oh, I've forgotten.

    Thanks.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: I've forgotten or I forgot

    No great difference, no. The upshot is the same. I can't tell you the name of the programme.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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