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    #1

    Question THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE RECENTLY

    Please help me with these words!!!! I don't know their meanings

    1. neet
    2. shedquarters
    3. peerents
    4. moregeoisie
    5. newpeat
    6. slurb
    7. glocalization
    8. locavores

    Thank you in advance!

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE RECENTLY

    None of those are English words. If they are being used as slang, you might have luck with Urban Dictionary. I don't see any point in learning them, since today's slang will be on tomorrow's discard pile.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE RECENTLY

    A NEET is a young person classified by the Department of Work and Pensions as 'Not in Employment, Education, or Training'; it is not slang; it is jargon used by people involved in the worlds of work and training. The others look like portmanteau words: e.g. 2 - shed + headquarters [that is the centre of what looks like a big corporation that is in fact a garden shed or a garage]; 3 - peers + parents [the sort of baby-boomer parents who treat their children as peers]; 4 - more + bourgeoisie...

    But those are guesses, and the words are not idiomatic. Sometimes wordplay like this does become idiomatic, as in the case of, say 'metrosexual' [metropolitan + heterosexual]; but usually it has the limited life of a one-off journalistic joke.

    b

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    #4

    Re: THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE RECENTLY

    "Locavores" are people who only eat locally-produced food. Some because they think it healthier, others because they think it reduces their "carbon footprint."

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE RECENTLY

    The only one that means anything to me is "locavores". I've heard it used a fair bit recently to describe people who try to eat only food and drink which has been made/grown locally. It's an environmentally based decision so that people can say that their food has caused as little "carbon footprint" as possible, and has travelled as few "food miles" as possible.

    Another food-related one in the same vein is "freegans". These are vegans who visit the dustbins/waste bins behind supermarkets and other food shops and retrieve perfectly edible fruit, vegetables and any other food suitable for vegans which has been thrown out simply because the last date by which they can legally be sold has been reached. Some people have brought their weekly food bill down to zero by this method. Sadly, many of the supermarkets have started to padlock the bins and surrounded them with barbed wire to stop these people "stealing" the food.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #6

    Re: THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE RECENTLY

    Markets and restaurants lock up the garbage because, in this litigious society, people could sue a company for making them ill after eating expired food out of the garbage.

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    #7

    Re: THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE RECENTLY

    thanks to Barb_D, i got most of them in urban dictionary, except " moregeoisie", but it's ok thanks everybody anyway

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE RECENTLY

    Quote Originally Posted by nicky_bear169 View Post
    thanks to Barb_D, i got most of them in urban dictionary, except " moregeoisie", but it's ok thanks everybody anyway
    For that one, look up 'bourgeoisie' in a proper dictionary, and add 'more'. In the 1950s in the UK, but earlier in the US, the bourgeoisie aspired to having a refrigerator; now almost everyone in the Western world does, and the bourgeoisie aspires to having a home cinema. Yesterday's luxuries are today's commonplaces and tomorrow's necessities. In Europe, internet access (via broadband, of course) has been called a 'human right'. (There should be a :sheesh: smiley, but this'll do: )

    b

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