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    #1

    cunning

    1. Tim was so cunny and deceived all money from Jan.


    2. Government was so cunny in cutting down the manpower so as to reserve the money for the future plan for
    Government.

    Which one of the above sentence is correct?

    Thank you.

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    #2

    re: cunning

    What makes you think one of them is correct?

    They are both ungrammatical, even if you changed the adjective to cunning.

    Rover

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    #3

    Re: cunning

    And cunny has a very rude, albeit archaic, meaning. (Warning taboo language in the link)

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    #4

    Re: cunning

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    And cunny has a very rude, albeit archaic, meaning. (Warning taboo language in the link)
    I wasn't going to mention that.

    Ju had that word as the thread title—that's why I changed it.

    Rover

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    #5

    Re: cunning

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I wasn't going to mention that.

    Ju had that word as the thread title—that's why I changed it.

    Rover
    Any suggestion to write it correctly, please?
    Thank you.

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    #6

    Re: cunning

    1. Tim was cunning enough to cheat Jan out of all her money.

    2. The government cunningly cut down the workforce to save money for its future plans.

    Rover

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: cunning

    Perhaps 'canny' was intended.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: cunning

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    And cunny has a very rude, albeit archaic, meaning. (Warning taboo language in the link)
    Victorian* nannies, to avoid the risks inherent in the Latin cuniculus (Sp conejo, 'rabbit'), made sure that their charges called them 'bunny rabbits'. But the C is preserved in the word used for rabbit fur - 'coney' (/kǝʊni:/, unlike 'honey' and 'money').

    b
    *I'd have to do some research to check whether this is an anachronism. Could be Edwardian, or earlier.

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    #9

    Re: cunning

    I had no idea where bunny came from- fascinating.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: cunning

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Perhaps 'canny' was intended.
    But beware, Ju. Although canny and cunning are related etymologically, and overlap in meaning, they have different overtones. A supporter would talk about a 'canny government', making the right decisions. But someone who didn't approve of those decisions might talk about a 'cunniing government'.

    b

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