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    #1

    what is the name of this sign?

    We write the short forms this way:
    I'm ...
    I've ....
    1) I want to know the name of that little vertical line (')that we use to make short forms.
    2) I think it's the same as the sign that we use to show stress. Am I right?

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    #2

    Re: what is the name of this sign?

    It's called an apostrophe. Read about its use here.

    Some dictionaries use the sign to indicate stressed syllables.

    Rover

  1. mathias_r's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: what is the name of this sign?

    -not a teacher-

    1) When used to quote something they are called ‘single quotes’, but should be slightly different in appearance (curly instead of a straight vertical stroke)
    2) The stress mark of the IPA notation looks almost exactly the same but is in fact another character. On computers the Unicode scheme is nowadays used to encode most characters. The IPA stress mark ˈ is number U+02C8 of the scheme, the apostrophe ' is encoded as number U+0027 (inherited from ASCII code), while the preferred apostrophe character in Unicode is ’ (U+2019), which is also the closing single quotation mark, whereas ‘ (U+2018) is the one to begin a single quote.


    The exact difference of these characters is only relevant when writing books, etc. In everyday usage the apostrophe on your keyboard serves all purposes. I think some word processing programmes automatically change the apostrophe you entered to the typographical correct one.

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    #4

    Re: what is the name of this sign?

    We write the short forms this way:
    I'm ...
    I've ....
    1) I want to know the name of that little vertical line (')that we use to make short forms.
    2) I think it's the same as the sign that we use to show stress. Am I right?


    1) This is an "apostrophe", also used to form possessives (John's hat).

    2) The symbol sometimes used in dictionaries to indicate that the previous sound should be stressed, is called a "prime symbol" or just a "prime". It resembles a generic form of apostrophe but shouldn't be confused with either an apostrophe or with other similar marks, like accents. Primes are also used to indicate various measurements like feet (in length), minutes etc.

    A genuine apostrophe should be in the typeface of the text in which it occurs, and so its form can vary as per these examples.
    , , ,

    not a teacher

    PS: I'm too late, but I'll leave the post up for the examples of apostrophes.





    Last edited by Rover_KE; 20-Aug-2012 at 17:47. Reason: Correcting typo

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: what is the name of this sign?

    Quote Originally Posted by mathias_r View Post
    1) When used to quote something they are called ‘single quotes’, but should be slightly different in appearance (curly instead of a straight vertical stroke
    Both single quotes and the apostrophe ,are 'curly, but may be non-curly ' if a typewriter is used. This sign is often used for the stress mark, as some fonts do not have the IPA /ˈ/

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    #6

    Re: what is the name of this sign?

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    1) This is an "apostrophe", also used to form possessives (John's hat).

    2) The symbol sometimes used in dictionaries to indicate that the previous sound should be stressed, is called a "prime symbol" or just a "prime". It resembles a generic form of apostrophe but shouldn't be confused with either an apostrophe or with other similar marks, like accents. Primes are also used to indicate various measurements like feet (in length), minutes etc.

    A genuine apostrophe should be in the typeface of the text in which it occurs, and so it's form can vary as per these examples.
    , , ,

    not a teacher

    PS: I'm too late, but I'll leave the post up for the examples of apostrophes.

    Thank everyone.
    Two other questions were brought up:
    1. So is the sign in the word "café" called an "accent" or an "acute"? And what's the difference between them?
    2. It was said "The symbol sometimes used in dictionaries to indicate that the previous sound should be stressed." Does the symbol show that the previous or following sound should be stressed?

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: what is the name of this sign?

    Quote Originally Posted by English4everyone View Post
    Thank everyone.
    Two other questions were brought up:
    1. So is the sign in the word "café" called an "accent" or an "acute"? And what's the difference between them?
    2. It was said "The symbol sometimes used in dictionaries to indicate that the previous sound should be stressed." Does the symbol show that the previous or following sound should be stressed?
    In French, there are two different angled lines which go over the letter "e". One is the "acute" accent and the other is "grave". They both change the pronunciation of that specific letter "e" in that specific word. Both of those pronunciations are different to an unaccented "e". Google "pronunciation of acute and grave accents in French" to find some examples.

    I'm not sure what you mean by your second question. Do you mean in dictionaries, is an "apostrophe" is placed after a stressed letter or sound? Can you show us a definition from a dictionary which uses this symbol?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 20-Aug-2012 at 15:45. Reason: Missing words!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8

    Re: what is the name of this sign?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'm not sure what you mean by your second question. Do you mean dictionaries, an "apostrophe" is placed after a stressed letter or sound? Can you show us a definition from a dictionary which uses this symbol?
    It was said by JMurray in his/her post.
    The question is when we put stress on a syllable in a word, does it show that the previous sound should be stressed or the following sound? For example: imagination => /ɪˌmædʒ·əˈneɪ·ʃən/, the apostrophe is on "n" so that part /ˈneɪ/ is stressed, isn' it?

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    #9

    Re: what is the name of this sign?

    Quote Originally Posted by English4everyone View Post
    It was said by JMurray in his/her post.
    The question is when we put stress on a syllable in a word, does it show that the previous sound should be stressed or the following sound? For example: imagination => /ɪˌmædʒ·əˈneɪ·ʃən/, the apostrophe is on "n" so that part /ˈneɪ/ is stressed, isn' it?
    My mistake. This mark is most often used before the syllable that's to be stressed as in your example, although some dictionaries (eg American Heritage Dictionary) do place it after the stress and my Shorter Oxford places a raised point after the stress. So it does vary. Also note that, as has been explained in previous posts, this stress mark is not an apostrophe.

    not a teacher

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