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    #1

    What logic is this: experience relapses with complete recovery...?

    I guesss "with" here refers to "in the condition of": In the condition of "complete or near-complete recovery interspersed with periods of clinical remission", most patients still experience relapses.

    Am I on the right track?


    Multiple Sclerosis
    Claire S. Riley
    Mark J. Tullman
    MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS of unknown cause. The course is extremely variable, but most patients initially experience relapses with complete or near-complete recovery interspersed with periods of clinical remission. Although a minority of patients have only minimal symptoms, most become disabled in time as a result of incomplete recovery from relapses or conversion to a progressive phase of the disease.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What logic is this: experience relapses with complete recovery...?

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHopeR View Post
    I guesss "with" here refers to "in the condition of": In the condition of "complete or near-complete recovery interspersed with periods of clinical remission", most patients still experience relapses.

    Am I on the right track?


    Multiple Sclerosis
    Claire S. Riley
    Mark J. Tullman
    MS is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS of unknown cause. The course is extremely variable, but most patients initially experience relapses with complete or near-complete recovery interspersed with periods of clinical remission. Although a minority of patients have only minimal symptoms, most become disabled in time as a result of incomplete recovery from relapses or conversion to a progressive phase of the disease.
    No. In my opinion, it introduces extra information.

    "Most patients initially experience relapses, but they go on to completely (or nearly completely) recover although that recovery is interspersed with periods of remission."

    It would have been helpful if there had a been a comma somewhere in that sentence because, as I see it, there are two ways to read it. The two possibilities I can see are as follows:

    1) Most patients initially experience relapses, with complete or near-complete recovery interspersed with periods of clinical remission.

    2) Most patients initially experience relapses with complete or near-complete recovery, interspersed with periods of clinical remission.

    The second one isn't as likely, in my opinion.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: What logic is this: experience relapses with complete recovery...?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    No. In my opinion, it introduces extra information.

    "Most patients initially experience relapses, but they go on to completely (or nearly completely) recover although that recovery is interspersed with periods of remission."

    Thanks.
    But the context also says " most become disabled in time as a result of incomplete recovery from relapses." It seems to contradict what you just explained. Is this "most" refering to "the most of the minority"?

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What logic is this: experience relapses with complete recovery...?

    Quote Originally Posted by NewHopeR View Post
    Thanks.
    But the context also says " most become disabled in time as a result of incomplete recovery from relapses." It seems to contradict what you just explained. Is this "most" refering to "the most of the minority"?
    The key word is "initially".

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    #5

    Re: What logic is this: experience relapses with complete recovery...?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    The key word is "initially".
    I am still very confused.

    emsr2d2 pointed out "Most patients initially experience relapses, but they go on to completely (or nearly completely) recover although that recovery is interspersed with periods of remission."
    That is: in the beginning, most patients experience relapses; but the situation will change: they will thereafter continue to recover (meantimes interrupted with periods of remission though).
    In other words, first relapse, finally recover!
    But now it says "(finally) most become disabled in time as a result of incomplete recovery from relapses...".
    Everything seems to be turned upside down!



  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: What logic is this: experience relapses with complete recovery...?

    I'm happy to admit that I can't work out the logic of it either. Apart from anything else, MS is not an illness from which "most patients recover" in any way. I can only think that what the writer means is that the progression of MS is that people don't just gradually get sicker and sicker at a predictable and constantly degenerating rate.

    From my limited experience of MS (one of my ex-colleagues is a sufferer), sometimes she has symptoms and sometimes she doesn't. She has good days and bad days. Sometimes, you would never know there is anything wrong with her - I guess that is like a period of remission. Sometimes, she seems quite sick and has trouble walking (relapse). There doesn't seem to be any pattern to it - just sometimes she is OK and sometimes she isn't.

    However, in the end, as she knows, she will almost certainly end up permanently disabled by the disease. The periods of remission and feeling well will probably reduce until the MS symptoms are permanent.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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