Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 1,458
    #1

    Omitting personal pronoun

    I have no intention to glorify “H.H.” No doubt, he is horrible, is is abject, he is a shining example of moral leprosy, a mixture of ferocity and jocularity that betrays supreme misery perhaps, but (he) is not conducive to attractiveness.
    From Nabokov's Lolita. Why is it possible to leave out "he", as the author did in the example above. I never know when I can and when I cannot leave out the personal pronoun. Do you leave them out when it's clear what the pronoun would have been?

    Are there any rules that govern this principle?

    Thank you in advance.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #2

    Re: Omitting personal pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by Chicken Sandwich View Post
    From Nabokov's Lolita. Why is it possible to leave out "he", as the author did in the example above. I never know when I can and when I cannot leave out the personal pronoun. Do you leave them out when it's clear what the pronoun would have been?

    Are there any rules that govern this principle?

    Thank you in advance.
    The writer has not omitted anything. "He" is not appropriate there.

    The fact that he is horrible, abject, an example of moral leprosy, and a mixture of ferocity and jocularity which betrays supreme misery is not conducive to attractiveness.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 1,458
    #3

    Re: Omitting personal pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The writer has not omitted anything. "He" is not appropriate there.
    I think that I've never seen "but" used this way. I have looked up "but" to see if I can find this usage, but I couldn't find it. I understand what this sentence means, after having read your explanantion.

    So if I understand correctly, "but" can be used to refer to all that came before? If so, "but" could be replaced by "which", right?

    I have no intention to glorify “H.H.” No doubt, he is horrible, is is abject, he is a shining example of moral leprosy, a mixture of ferocity and jocularity that betrays supreme misery perhaps, which is not conducive to attractiveness.
    Thank you.
    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 19-Aug-2012 at 00:27.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,218
    #4

    Re: Omitting personal pronoun

    I thought it was the mixture that was not conducive.
    Last edited by 5jj; 19-Aug-2012 at 06:12.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 3,505
    #5

    Re: Omitting personal pronoun

    I don't know of any "rule" and I agree with your assessment.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #6

    Re: Omitting personal pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I thought it was the mixture that was not conducive.
    I agree.

    I have no intention to glorify “H.H.” No doubt, he is horrible, he is abject, he is a shining example of moral leprosy, a mixture of ferocity and jocularity that betrays supreme misery perhaps, but (that) is not conducive to attractiveness.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,843
    #7

    Re: Omitting personal pronoun

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I agree.

    I have no intention to glorify “H.H.” No doubt, he is horrible, he is abject, he is a shining example of moral leprosy, a mixture of ferocity and jocularity that betrays supreme misery perhaps, but (that) is not conducive to attractiveness.
    Hmmm. I agree, though I would say that the final "that" refers to the whole section starting with "he is horrible" and going all the way through to "betrays supreme misery".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Similar Threads

  1. personal pronoun
    By Annie Chang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 22-Oct-2011, 13:03
  2. personal pronoun
    By Allen165 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 18-Jan-2010, 20:19
  3. object pronoun vs personal pronoun
    By Abstract Idea in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 23-Dec-2009, 22:10
  4. what is a personal pronoun?
    By yeng23 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 03-Jul-2008, 12:54
  5. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 02-May-2008, 04:58

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •