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    #1

    to go over

    Dear teachers and native speakers, I'm opening this new thread because I'd like to be confirmed or not about the use of the verb "to go over" and some of its meanings.

    1) to go over - to go to someone's house for a short visit.
    Can it be replaced by the verbs "to drop in on", "to look up", to call in" and "to stop over" with the same meaning?

    Ex. Have you gone over to Nicole's to see her baby yet?
    Ex. I'm going to go over to Erik's house for dinner.

    In these two sentences, is it possibile to place all the verbs I have written in quotation marks, meaning the same concept? Or are some those verbs more used than the others?

    2) to go over - to examine and to check a written document or material.
    I've got a similar question. In sentences like the ones below, is it possibile to replace "go over" with verbs such as "to check out", "to look at", "to look over" and "to go through", and to mean the same?
    Does "to go over" mean to check, or to rehearse? I cannot catch this. Could it be a synonym of "to brush up on something"?

    Ex. The President is in his study, going over his speech for the following day at the ONU conference.
    Ex. We went over the notes before the exam.

    3) to go over - when an idea, suggestion is accepted and liked by other people, it goes over.
    Now, my question in this case is the following: in sentences like the one below,
    Ex. The singer's performance went over well with the critics.
    Ex. I'm afraid the new law will go over soon.
    Ex. Actually, because of my behaviour, I don't get over well with people

    can "go over" be replaces by "to come across"?

    I hope you can help me with these three points because I've been studying phrasal verbs with the verb GO and their common use, but I'm finding this verb very difficult and I'm trying to associate it with other verbs I already know and I'm used to using without too many difficulties.

    Thanks a lot for your help.
    Last edited by dilodi83; 24-Aug-2012 at 12:00. Reason: Incomplete

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to go over

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Dear teachers and native speakers, I'm opening this new thread because I'd like to be confirmed or not about the use of the verb "to go over" and some of its meanings.



    2) to go over - to examine and to check a written document or material.
    I've got a similar question. In sentences like the ones below, is it possibile to replace "go over" with verbs such as "to check out", "to look at", "to look over" and "to go through", and to mean the same?
    Does "to go over" mean to check, or to rehearse? I cannot catch this. Could it be a synonym of "to brush up on something"?

    Ex. The President is in his study, going over his speech for the following day at the ONU conference.
    Ex. We went over the notes before the exam. "brush up on" wouldn't work in these examples.

    3) to go over - when an idea, suggestion is accepted and liked by other people, it goes over.
    Now, my question in this case is the following: in sentences like the one below,
    Ex. The singer's performance went over well with the critics.
    Ex. I'm afraid the new law will go over soon.
    Ex. Actually, because of my behaviour, I don't get over well with people

    can "go over" be replaces by "to come across"? No, and only the first one is OK with "go over".

    I hope you can help me with these three points because I've been studying phrasal verbs with the verb GO and their common use, but I'm finding this verb very difficult and I'm trying to associate it with other verbs I already know and I'm used to using without too many difficulties.

    Thanks a lot for your help.
    Bhai.

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    #3

    Re: to go over

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Bhai.
    what about the verbs in point 1 and those in point 2? Are they correct?

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to go over

    Generally when we don't make a comment on a point, it's because it's fine. Note you did get a comment on #2.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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