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      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
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    #1

    alternative to ready-made

    Every time I went to a store and used ready-made in the conversation with the clerk, they didn't understand what I was saying. For example, I go to a store selling corn dog. Sometimes it runs out of cooked corn dogs and needs to cook some when someone wants one. I don't want to wait, so I would ask, "Do you have any ready-made corn dog?" I think the reason why people don't understand what I am saying maybe because ready-made is not a common AEexpression and not heard in the conversation often. I want to know the alternative way to say "ready-made" in this context.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: alternative to ready-made

    Quote Originally Posted by aha123 View Post
    Every time I went to a store and used ready-made in the conversation with the clerk, they didn't understand what I was saying. For example, I go to a store selling corn dog. Sometimes it runs out of cooked corn dogs and needs to cook some when someone wants one. I don't want to wait, so I would ask, "Do you have any ready-made corn dog?" I think the reason why people don't understand what I am saying maybe because ready-made is not a common AEexpression and not heard in the conversation often. I want to know the alternative way to say "ready-made" in this context.
    I don't know what a "corn dog" is, but in this sort of situation I would say "Do you have any "corn dogs" ready?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: alternative to ready-made

    Or, to make it clearer, '...ready to take away now'.

    The problem is that 'ready-made' is not used in cases like that - it applies to things that are made not cooked. It means 'ready to prepare', not 'ready to eat'.
    Example:
    Some people insist on making their spaghetti fresh with eggs and flour, with all the palaver of a spaghetti-making machine, and draping it over radiators on damp tea-towels, then getting tired of waiting - and cooking it before it has fully dried (which makes the timings they have learnt from cooking the dried sort all wrong). They hold that this is the only traditionally 'correct' way. They seem to be unaware that most Italians buy it ready-made, and cook the fully-dried product straight out of the packet. That's the point: for ease of transport, handling, and storage it is traditionally sold ready-made.

    b

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