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    #1

    adjective 'impossible'

    Hello.

    I have two scenarios ;

    1. His placement test score is too low. I think it is impossible to teach him in this class.

    2. He made me blow up during the class. I think he is impossible to teach in this class. I will transfer him to other class or kick him out.

    Are those two sentences underlined meaning the same thing, so compatible ?

    Thank you.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: adjective 'impossible'

    Quote Originally Posted by yamamoto View Post
    Hello.

    I have two scenarios ;

    1. His placement test score is too low. I think it is impossible to teach him in this class.

    2. He made me blow up during the class. I think he is impossible to teach in this class. I will transfer him to other class or kick him out.

    Are those two sentences underlined meaning the same thing, so compatible ?

    Thank you.
    'Compatible' doesn't mean that they mean the same thing. It means that they don't contradict each other.
    Yes they mean the same thing.

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    #3

    Re: adjective 'impossible'

    Thank you.

    Let me be more specific.

    I learned 'impossible' could be used to describe someone who makes the other annoyed. So, for the second scenario I was intending to use the very meaning of the 'impossible'.

    And in the first scenario, I wasn't mentioning his ill manners but his relatively low competence. In spite of that, is it still possible to use either sentence ?

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: adjective 'impossible'

    Quote Originally Posted by yamamoto View Post
    Thank you.

    Let me be more specific.

    I learned 'impossible' could be used to describe someone who makes the other annoyed. So, for the second scenario I was intending to use the very meaning of the 'impossible'.
    No, the sentence doesn't mean "He's impossible" in that sense. It explicitly says, "He's impossible to teach."
    If you had written, "I can't teach him. He's impossible!", it could have that meaning.


    And in the first scenario, I wasn't mentioning his ill manners but his relatively low competence. In spite of that, is it still possible to use either sentence ?
    Well, no, you didn't mention, or even allude to, his relatively low competence. You gave no reason for why he made you blow up in class.
    They mean the same.

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    #5

    Re: adjective 'impossible'

    Thanks for your quick reply.

    As an English learner, can I make a note of the usage of 'impossible' like this? That is, adjective impossible can describe people when it is used like "Someone is impossible." meaning the person is stubborn or something.

    But when it is followed by 'to-infinitive', it means doing something is impossible or something is not able to be done.

    Thank you.

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    #6

    Re: adjective 'impossible'

    Quote Originally Posted by yamamoto View Post
    Thanks for your quick reply.

    As an English learner, can I make a note of the usage of 'impossible' like this? That is, adjective impossible can describe people when it is used like "Someone is impossible." meaning the person is stubborn or something.
    Yes

    But when it is followed by 'to-infinitive', it means doing something is impossible or something is not able to be done.

    Thank you.
    Yes, "He is impossible to love"; "He is impossible to listen to"; "I find him impossible to vote for" etc.

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    #7

    Re: adjective 'impossible'

    Reading the thread, I have found myself more and more useless because I haven't been able to get it.. Does "He is impossible to love" mean the same as:

    1)To love is impossible for him.
    or
    2) He is impossible to be loved.


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    #8

    Re: adjective 'impossible'

    Quote Originally Posted by tom3m View Post
    "He is impossible to love"
    It is not possible to love him.

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