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    #1

    When "while" used to mean "although", it can not be followed by a clause?

    I got the following sentence from wiki dictionary:

    While - although
    This case, while interesting, is a bit frustrating.


    That is, it can only be followed by an adjective:

    This football team, while young, has nerves of steel. (My sentence)

    When "while" is followed by a clause, it will mean "at the same time"?

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: When "while" used to mean "although", it can not be followed by a clause?

    No. "While this case is interesting, it's a bit frustrating" is fine.

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    #3

    Re: When "while" used to mean "although", it can not be followed by a clause?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    No. "While this case is interesting, it's a bit frustrating" is fine.
    In your sentence, while means although?

  2. Academic Writing's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: When "while" used to mean "although", it can not be followed by a clause?

    You'll know that "while" means "at the same time" when the sentence mentions and compares two actions that happened at the same time. :)

    Some editorial styles aren't so picky about when to use each word. In scientific writing it is common to specify "while" (reserved for comparing actions at the same time), "whereas," "although," "and," or "but." APA takes a hard stance on this. In less formal writing many people simply use "while" for all of those uses.
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  3. Academic Writing's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: When "while" used to mean "although", it can not be followed by a clause?

    Yes. :) Or you might say that "while" means "while," if you accept that "while" can be used for instances that do not involve time. ;)
    SeriousScholar.com

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