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  1. sky3120's Avatar
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    #1

    Please help me out


    I have asked the same question several times but I could not get any answers ,so please give me your precious opinions.

    I know that "a guy who studies English" can be "a guy studying English", but why don't people think "the guy, who studies English" can be "the guy, studying English" ? Nevertheless, I could see many phrases written like the second example. That's why I am so confused. What do you teachers here think about this issue? Thank you so much.




  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Please help me out

    Please give complete sentences, not just fragments.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Please help me out

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post

    I have asked the same question several times but I could not get any answers ,so please give me your precious opinions.

    I know that "a guy who studies English" can be "a guy studying English", but why don't people think "the guy, who studies English" can be "the guy, studying English" ? Nevertheless, I could see many phrases written like the second example. That's why I am so confused. What do you teachers here think about this issue? Thank you so much.



    It's impossible to say what I think about this "issue" as I'm not sure what you think the issue is. You need to post some full sentences using the phrases you are querying as I'm not really sure what you are asking.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Please help me out

    A better title would also help some.
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  5. sky3120's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Please help me out

    Sorry. Here are examples:

    1) People who speak English well can make lots of friends.

    2) People speaking English well can make lots of friends.

    3) I met your brother, who speaks English well.

    4) I met your brother, speaking English well.

    I have learned that people who speak...can be people speaking...but I have never met people saying that your brother, who speaks can be your brother, speaking...

    However "who is or which is" can be omitted even in non defining relative clauses, so I think we can also think "who" or "which" can be omitted even in non defining relative clauses. What do you think? Thank you.

  6. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Please help me out

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post
    Sorry. Here are examples:

    1) People who speak English well can make lots of friends.
    This means that people who are able to speak English well can make lots of friends.

    2) People speaking English well can make lots of friends.
    If I saw this, I would think that it meant that these people can only make lots of friends at the time that they are speaking English. They don't make friends when they are speaking another language. That would be rather strange.

    3) I met your brother, who speaks English well.
    That makes sense. It is clear that it is the brother who is able to speak English well.

    4) I met your brother, speaking English well.
    This is unclear. At the time of meeting, either you or the brother was speaking good English. It's not clear if it is "I" or "your brother" who was speaking English when the two met.

    I have learned that people who speak...can be people speaking...but I have never met people saying that your brother, who speaks can be your brother, speaking...

    However "who is or which is" can be omitted even in non defining relative clauses, so I think we can also think "who" or "which" can be omitted even in non defining relative clauses. What do you think? Thank you.
    I don't think that the construction you are querying works for all verbs, and "to speak" is one it doesn't really work for. I have tried to come up with a couple of examples which work the way I think you mean:

    People who have powerful cars drive quite fast.
    People having powerful cars drive quite fast.

    Cats who eat a high protein diet live longer.
    Cats eating a high protein diet live longer.

    People who drink more than twelve units of alcohol every weekend run the risk of developing cirrhosis.
    People drinking more than twelve units of alcohol every weekend run the risk of developing cirrhosis.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  7. sky3120's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Please help me out

    I have gotten your point. Thank you so much. And Can I ask one more?

    Tom, who is staying here, is my friend. Can I omit 'who is' here like "London, (which is) located on the River Thames, is the capital of England."
    Last edited by sky3120; 27-Aug-2012 at 15:36.

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