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    #1

    Question a sentence that i don't know the structure.

    "For example,all a VFR pilot has to do to enter Class C airspace is establish two-way radio contact with ATC."

    the red words are what i confused,because i can't tell which is the major sentence's predicate,and i also not very clear about its structure,such as which part is attributive clause.

    the part of being marked bold and italic is a attributive clause, is that right?

    thank for someone would like to give a answer, very much.
    Last edited by orangebo; 28-Aug-2012 at 08:41.

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    #2

    Re: a sentence that i don't know the structure.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello, Orangebo:

    1. Welcome to usingenglish.com.

    2. Thank you for teaching me the term "attributive clause." The Web told me that many people prefer the terms "adjective clause" or "relative clause."

    3. This is the "Ask a Teacher" forum. When you have time, please check out the "Diagramming" forum. There is a teacher there who helps members parse (analyze) the parts of sentences, and he will even draw a diagram for you.

    *****

    Regarding your sentence, may I offer some ideas (these are not "answers").

    1. In my opinion, your sentence does not contain any adjective clauses.

    2. In order to analyze your sentence, may I simplify it a bit?

    All a VFR pilot has to do to enter Class C airspace is establish two-way radio contact.

    That seems (to me) to mean:

    The only thing (that a VCR pilot has to do to enter Class C airspace) + is + (to establish two-way radio contact).

    a. In my opinion, "(that) a VCR pilot has to do to enter Class C airspace" is a noun/substantive clause in apposition with

    "thing." (Some people might interpret it as an adjective clause. I disagree, for "that" in that sentence plays no

    grammatical role. It is neither the subject nor the object. It only formally introduces the appositional clause.)

    b. "is" is a linking verb. It links (connects) "all" (the only thing) with "(to) establish two-way radio contact with ATC."
    (You can delete (drop) "to" if you want to.)

    c. In my opinion, we can parse "(to) establish two-way radio contact with ATC" as the subjective complement of

    "all." That is, all (the only thing) = to establish two-way radio contact with ATC.

    (OR: To establish two-way radio contact with ATC is all a VFR pilot has to do to enter Class C airspace.)

    d. "radio contact." As you can see, the noun "radio" modifies the noun "contact." If you want to, I think (repeat: think)

    that you can call "radio" a so-called "attributive noun," but surely NOT an attributive "clause."

    e. In my opinion, "two-way" modifies "radio contact." That is, "radio contact is two ways." I do not know what to call

    "two-way" in your sentence except a compound adjective.

    f. "contact with ATC" = the prepositional phrase "with ATC" modifies "contact."

    g. Finally, as to the predicate of the sentence. As you know, a sentence has two parts: the subject and the predicate

    (which is defined as everything except the subject): "I love newspapers." ("I" = subject; "love newspapers" = predicate).

    Thus, maybe:

    "All a pilot has to do to enter Class C airspace" (subject)"

    "is establish two-way radio contact with ATC." (predicate).



    Sincerely yours,


    James

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    #3

    Re: a sentence that i don't know the structure.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    The only thing (that a VCR pilot has to do to enter Class C airspace) + is + (to establish two-way radio contact).

    a. In my opinion, "(that) a VCR pilot has to do to enter Class C airspace" is a noun/substantive clause in apposition with

    "thing." (Some people might interpret it as an adjective clause. I disagree, for "that" in that sentence plays no

    grammatical role. It is neither the subject nor the object. It only formally introduces the appositional clause.)
    Hello, TheParser.

    "The only thing that a VCR pilot has to do to enter Class C airspace is to establish two-way radio contact."

    'that a VCR pilot has to do' in the sentence above is a relative clause in my opinion.
    'that' is a relative pronoun and the object of 'do'.
    What do you think?

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    #4

    Re: a sentence that i don't know the structure.

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    'that a VCR pilot has to do' in the sentence above is a relative clause in my opinion.
    'that' is a relative pronoun and the object of 'do'.
    What do you think?
    I agree.

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    #5

    Re: a sentence that i don't know the structure.

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello, Tzfujimino:

    Thank you for your kind note. It is always a pleasure to "chat" with you.

    You are a teacher, so -- of course -- I defer to your judgment, as should any other members who are interested in

    this matter.

    *****
    Personally, I think that it is a noun clause.

    1. "The only thing that a VCR pilot must do is to establish radio contact."

    Yes, in that sentence, we can agree that "that" refers to "the only thing," so it is the object of "do."

    2. But the sentence is "The only thing that a VCR pilot must do (in order) to enter Class C airspace is to establish

    radio contact."

    a. I think that it is clear that the object of "do" is "(in order) to enter Class C airspace," not "that."

    b. If one says that the object of "do" is "that," then that means "(in order) to enter Class C airspace" is left

    stranded, for it needs to serve as the direct object of some verb. In my (very) humble opinion, that verb must be

    "do."


    Sincerely yours,


    James

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    #6

    Re: a sentence that i don't know the structure.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Personally, I think that it is a noun clause.

    1. "The only thing that a VCR pilot must do is to establish radio contact."

    Yes, in that sentence, we can agree that "that" refers to "the only thing," so it is the object of "do."

    2. But the sentence is "The only thing that a VCR pilot must do (in order) to enter Class C airspace is to establish

    radio contact."

    a. I think that it is clear that the object of "do" is "(in order) to enter Class C airspace," not "that."

    b. If one says that the object of "do" is "that," then that means "(in order) to enter Class C airspace" is left

    stranded, for it needs to serve as the direct object of some verb. In my (very) humble opinion, that verb must be

    "do."


    Sincerely yours,


    James
    Hello, TheParser.
    Thank you for your comments as always.

    "The only thing that a VCR pilot must do (in order) to enter Class C airspace is to establish radio contact."

    I wholeheartedly agree with you that 'to enter Class C airspace' is equal to 'in order to enter Class C airspace', as you suggested. So, it is adverbial. (I think it is called an 'adverbial infinitive phrase'.)
    I don't really think it is the object of 'do'. (I've just used your favorite word.)

    a. It's hard to accept the fact that she's gone.
    b. It's great to hear the news that the congresswoman is progressing so well.

    In those sentences (a. and b.), each 'that' is used as a conjunction introducing an appositional clause, in my humble opinion.

    c. The fact is that the governor's story didn't make sense.
    d. I think that it is a noun clause.
    e. That he said no is not surprising.

    In c., d. and e., each 'that' (which I believe is also a conjunction) introduces a noun clause.

    Do you agree?
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 29-Aug-2012 at 16:02.

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    #7

    Re: a sentence that i don't know the structure.

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post

    "The only thing that a VCR pilot must do (in order) to enter Class C airspace is to establish radio contact."

    I wholeheartedly agree with you that 'to enter Class C airspace' is equal to 'in order to enter Class C airspace', as you suggested. So, it is adverbial. (I think it is called an 'adverbial infinitive phrase'.)

    NOT A TEACHER

    Hello, Tzfujimino:

    Now I know why usingenglish.com requires us non-teachers to issue that warning at the beginning of a post.

    You are, indeed, 100% correct.

    1. A pilot must do that (the only thing).

    2. Why must he do that? (In order to enter Class C airspace.)

    a. "that" is the direct object of "must do."

    b. "In order to enter Class C airspace" is an infinitive phrase that modifies the verb phrase.

    3. I really appreciate the clarification.


    Sincerely yours,


    James

    P.S. I am suspending myself for one week. During the next 7 days, I shall not offer any "advice" to anyone.

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    #8

    Re: a sentence that i don't know the structure.

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    NOT A TEACHER

    Hello, Tzfujimino:

    Now I know why usingenglish.com requires us non-teachers to issue that warning at the beginning of a post.

    You are, indeed, 100% correct.

    1. A pilot must do that (the only thing).

    2. Why must he do that? (In order to enter Class C airspace.)

    a. "that" is the direct object of "must do."

    b. "In order to enter Class C airspace" is an infinitive phrase that modifies the verb phrase.

    3. I really appreciate the clarification.


    Sincerely yours,


    James

    P.S. I am suspending myself for one week. During the next 7 days, I shall not offer any "advice" to anyone.
    Hello, TheParser.
    I'm neither a grammarian nor an expert on this matter.
    I just posted what I learned at school when I was a student, and what I teach/have taught to my students.
    You don't have to suspend yourself at all. We've learnt a lot from you.
    We're looking forward to your comments (as we have always been.)

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