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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    physical comedy vs slapstick comedy

    This physical comedy is translated as "slapstick comedy", but I found "slapstick comedy" is a part of "physical comedy", which is a broader concept. What do you think?

    mo1-37
    ex)Buster Keaton was born in Piqua, Kansas, in America in 1894... He was best known for his silent films, in which his trademark was physical comedy....

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: physical comedy vs slapstick comedy

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    This physical comedy is translated as "slapstick comedy", but I found "slapstick comedy" is a part of "physical comedy", which is a broader concept. What do you think?

    mo1-37
    ex)Buster Keaton was born in Piqua, Kansas, in America in 1894... He was best known for his silent films, in which his trademark was physical comedy....
    keannu, you keep using this phrase, "X is translated as Y". What do you actually mean? Who has translated 'physical comedy' as 'slapstick comedy'?

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: physical comedy vs slapstick comedy

    The writings I quote are from study materials for high schoolers and middle schoolers, and there's always a tranlsation part for any original writing. To get the meaning of unknown words or phrases, we refer to the translation. The translation must have been made by professors or professional English teachers affiliated with the publishers.

    I don't know exactly who the translators are. The materials are so public that I try to accept the translation without any doubt, but sometimes some translation causes me to doubt its correctness.

    Are you really curious about who they are or the meaning of "X is translated as Y", which may sound awkward?

  4. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: physical comedy vs slapstick comedy

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    To get the meaning of unknown words or phrases, we refer to the translation.
    But why would you want to do that? I don't think that this is a good approach because referring to a Korean translation could make things more difficult. I'd say that if you don't understand a certain component of a text written in English, it would be better to just figure it out using an English dictionary.
    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 30-Aug-2012 at 01:54.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: physical comedy vs slapstick comedy

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    The writings I quote are from study materials for high schoolers and middle schoolers, and there's always a tranlsation part for any original writing. To get the meaning of unknown words or phrases, we refer to the translation. The translation must have been made by professors or professional English teachers affiliated with the publishers.

    I don't know exactly who the translators are. The materials are so public that I try to accept the translation without any doubt, but sometimes some translation causes me to doubt its correctness.

    Are you really curious about who they are or the meaning of "X is translated as Y", which may sound awkward?
    No, you've told me who does it. I'm not quite sure of the process.
    Do you mean it's a glossary of some kind? If you don't understand one English word (slapstick), they give you another English word (physical comedy) to help you?
    Or is it, as Chicken Sandwich has inferred, that if you don't understand a certain English word (slapstick) they give you a Korean word that when translated back into English means "physical comedy". We don't use "translate" for paraphrasing something in the same language. So "physical comedy" can't be translated as "slapstick comedy", and I'm wondering if there is any translation into another language involved. It matters.

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    #6

    Re: physical comedy vs slapstick comedy

    Slapstick comedy is one kind of physical comedy: it relies on such things as jerky movements, accidents, practical jokes, and the like.

    Physical comedy in general relies on appearance rather than speech. So an actor making a funny face is an example of physical comedy, though few would call facial mimicry slapstick.

    In general, therefore, I definitely agree slapstick is a subcategory of physical comedy.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: physical comedy vs slapstick comedy

    Quote Originally Posted by abaka View Post
    Slapstick comedy is one kind of physical comedy: it relies on such things as jerky movements, accidents, practical jokes, and the like.

    Physical comedy in general relies on appearance rather than speech. So an actor making a funny face is an example of physical comedy, though few would call facial mimicry slapstick.

    In general, therefore, I definitely agree slapstick is a subcategory of physical comedy.
    Yes exactly. And poodle is a subclass of dog. If 'poodle' is being glossed as "a dog" (both in English), and keannu is then translating "dog" into Korean and realising that not all dogs are poodles, then coming here to ask what's going on, we would be able to tell him.
    What I need to know is what "poodle is translated as dog" means to keannu.

  7. keannu's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: physical comedy vs slapstick comedy

    I meant translation from English to Korean, which I doubted is wrong and that's why I always said "translated as".

  8. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: physical comedy vs slapstick comedy

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I meant translation from English to Korean, which I doubted is wrong and that's why I always said "translated as".
    Does Korean lack the word for "slapstick"? In most European languages there is no translation of "slapstick", the English word is used, just like it's written in English.
    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 30-Aug-2012 at 14:35.

  9. keannu's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: physical comedy vs slapstick comedy

    "Physical comedy" was translated to "slapstick comedy" as it is. Koreans use "slapstick comedy" as it is and they know it fairely well. I doubted if the two are synonyms, which were proved wrong by the teachers here. I know better than to not differentiate bigger concept from its subcategories.

    I don't know what Raymott intended by "poodle" and "dog", but I can tell the difference among easy ones, so whenever I ask with translation ambiguity, it's because the ambiguity is beyond my knowledge.
    Last edited by keannu; 30-Aug-2012 at 16:58.

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