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    #1

    hang out

    A: I have nothing to do tomorrow.
    B: How come? Don't you need to hang out with your girlfriend?

    Is there anything unnatural in the above conversation?

    Thanks!

    JY

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    #2

    Re: hang out

    No. Seems like a casual conversation between two friends.

    If you don't know the meaning of hang out, it's basically, accompany/play with/meet with etc


    Not a teacher.....Yet
    Last edited by HanibalII; 30-Aug-2012 at 10:00.

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    #3

    Re: hang out

    It wouldn't sound natural in an old folk's home, but apart from that it's OK.

    Rover

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    #4

    Re: hang out

    I was feeling uncertain because I found that the phrase verb is defined in Cambridge Dictionary as to spend a lot of time in a place or with someone (hang out - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online)

    It is so inaccurate!

    Quote Originally Posted by HanibalII View Post
    No. Seems like a casual conversation between two friends.

    If you don't know the meaning of hang out, it's basically, accompany/play with/meet with etc


    Not a teacher.....Yet

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    #5

    Re: hang out

    Thanks, but what do you mean by "an old folk's home"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It wouldn't sound natural in an old folk's home, but apart from that it's OK.

    Rover

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    #6

    Re: hang out

    Old people like me don't use that expression.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: hang out

    The only thing that sounded unnatural to me was the idea that someone would need to hang out with their girlfriend! I would have expected "Don't you want to hang out with your girlfriend?" or "Weren't you planning to hang out with your girlfriend?" or something similar but "need" seems to be an odd choice.

    An "old folks' home" is a retirement home or an old people's home (BrE). It is a communal facility where lots of old people live together. They usually go to live there when they are too old to look after themselves at home or sometimes if they are too ill to do so. Some provide nursing care, others simply provide a room, three meals a day and activities.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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