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    #1

    what verb in this situation?

    Hi teachers!
    I'm wondering what phrasal verb can be used when for example I'm in a sweat, maybe because I've worked out hard in the gym, so I'm completely wet (by the way, I don't know if "wet" is good in this context) and I want to use the hairdrier to dry the sweat.
    Which of the following ones is correct? : to dry out, to dry off, to wipe off, to wipe out and why...
    Thanks so much for the explanation.

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    #2

    Re: what verb in this situation?

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Hi teachers!
    I'm wondering what phrasal verb can be used when for example I'm in a sweat, maybe because I've worked out hard in the gym, so I'm completely wet (by the way, I don't know if "wet" is good in this context) and I want to use the hairdrier to dry the sweat.
    Which of the following ones is correct? : to dry out, to dry off, to wipe off, to wipe out and why...
    Thanks so much for the explanation.
    Well "wipe" is wrong, one doesn't wipe oneself with a hair-dryer. Why don't you shower?

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    #3

    Re: what verb in this situation?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Well "wipe" is wrong, one doesn't wipe oneself with a hair-dryer. Why don't you shower?
    Without a doubt this is a good idea , but if I don't want to take a shower in the gym, because I'm going to take it when I get back home, and I just want to dry the sweat, before going out and catching a cold, which verb should I use? Is it correct to use "to dry" if I use the hairdrier and the verb "to wipe" if I use a cloth to wipe the sweat on my body?

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    #4

    Re: what verb in this situation?

    The generic verb would be "dry". It would be safe to say "I'm going to use a hair dryer to dry the sweat", and get your meaning across. However, the phrasal verb "dry off" is even more precise if you're using a hair dryer. "To dry (something) off" means to remove a liquid from a surface (like your skin) by drying it. Bear in mind however, that you can say "I need to dry off the sweat" or "I need to dry off my skin" - the object of the phrasal verb can be either the liquid or the surface!

    "Dry off" can also be used intransitively, in which case it usually just means causing a liquid on a surface to dry (with a towel, hair dryer, natural evaporation, etc). After a shower, for example, you could say "I need to dry off." If your kitchen counter is wet after you have done the dishes, you can say "Don't bother with the towel - the counter will dry off eventually."

    If you use a cloth or towel, you have the choice of saying either "dry off the sweat" or "wipe off the sweat". Like "to dry (something) off", the verb "to wipe (something) off" is a separable phrasal verb. Be careful here, though: while you can say "I need to wipe off my skin" or "I need to wipe myself off", you should not use "wipe off" as an intransitive verb. It sounds a little strange, after a shower, to say "hand me a towel; I need to wipe off."

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    #5

    Re: what verb in this situation?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cory Sampson View Post
    The generic verb would be "dry". It would be safe to say "I'm going to use a hair dryer to dry the sweat", and get your meaning across. However, the phrasal verb "dry off" is even more precise if you're using a hair dryer. "To dry (something) off" means to remove a liquid from a surface (like your skin) by drying it. Bear in mind however, that you can say "I need to dry off the sweat" or "I need to dry off my skin" - the object of the phrasal verb can be either the liquid or the surface!

    "Dry off" can also be used intransitively, in which case it usually just means causing a liquid on a surface to dry (with a towel, hair dryer, natural evaporation, etc). After a shower, for example, you could say "I need to dry off." If your kitchen counter is wet after you have done the dishes, you can say "Don't bother with the towel - the counter will dry off eventually."

    If you use a cloth or towel, you have the choice of saying either "dry off the sweat" or "wipe off the sweat". Like "to dry (something) off", the verb "to wipe (something) off" is a separable phrasal verb. Be careful here, though: while you can say "I need to wipe off my skin" or "I need to wipe myself off", you should not use "wipe off" as an intransitive verb. It sounds a little strange, after a shower, to say "hand me a towel; I need to wipe off."

    Your answer has been complete and really useful. Thank you very much!

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