Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 1,458
    #1

    Do speakers of AmE know what a "star turn" is?

    From a CPE practice paper:

    Sven was the star .... in the school revue with his impersonations of all the teachers.

    It'll be my .... to cook a meal for us both next weekend.

    Don't drive too fast as you appraoch the next .... because there's a sharp embankment.
    The idea here is to think of one word that can be used in all three sentences. I chose "turn", which is the right answer according to the answer key, but I didn't know if "star turn" made any sense. I then looked up "star turn" and according to Longman, this collocation is used in BrE.

    I'm wondering if the examiners of the University of Cambridge use a lot distinctly "British" words in the CPE exam. Earlier, I was drawing a blank when I read, 'Today's technology removes the need for open-plan offices,' which according to Longman is also a British word. But, dictionaries are not always accurate in the distinction between AmE and BrE, hence my question.

    Thank you in advance.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #2

    Re: Do speakers of AmE know what a "star turn" is?

    I don't know the phrase.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,502
    #3

    Re: Do speakers of AmE know what a "star turn" is?

    The American dictionary Merriem-Webster is happy to list it under 'turn'.

    d : a short act or piece (as for a variety show); also : public appearance : performance <makes frequent guest star turns>

    Rover

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #4

    Re: Do speakers of AmE know what a "star turn" is?

    I feel I've seen it used with "did a start turn" but I've never seen it used for the performer - just the performance.

    So the first sentence, saying he "was the star turn," sounds odd to me.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,627
    #5

    Re: Do speakers of AmE know what a "star turn" is?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I feel I've seen it used with "did a start turn" but I've never seen it used for the performer - just the performance.

    So the first sentence, saying he "was the star turn," sounds odd to me.
    It's common enough in BrE.

Similar Threads

  1. Yoda's English ( in the film "Star Wars")
    By tzfujimino in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 18-May-2012, 10:04
  2. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 25-Apr-2012, 13:16
  3. Is the word plenty pronounced like "plendi" in AmE?
    By royal999 in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-Apr-2012, 19:10
  4. questions from "Alan Johson My pop star ambtions"
    By chebu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 31-Aug-2010, 09:40
  5. turn dreams into "reality" or "realities"?
    By linhtho0211 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Aug-2008, 14:10

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •