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  1. Huda-M's Avatar
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    #1

    Question AT, IN and ON

    Hi!

    I sometimes face confusion whether to use AT, IN or ON for any places etc

    As an example:

    The play is going on AT the stadium or is it going on IN the stadium??

    The bakery is AT the ABC road or ON the ABC road??

    Please help me solve this confusion :)

    Thanks!

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: AT, IN and ON

    Quote Originally Posted by Huda-M View Post
    Hi!

    I sometimes face confusion whether to use AT, IN or ON for any places etc

    As an example:

    The play is going on AT the stadium or is it going on IN the stadium??

    The bakery is AT the ABC road or ON the ABC road??

    Please help me solve this confusion :)

    Thanks!
    A play isn't usually on at a stadium. Plays are on at a theatre (theater in AmE). Perhaps you meant "the match" or "the game" if you were talking about sport. If that is the case, then you can use "at" or "in" with stadium.

    The bakery is in ABC Road (BrE).
    The bakery is on ABC Road (AmE).

    However, in BrE, we are starting to hear "on ABC Road" more often so it's not actually wrong in BrE.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Huda-M's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: AT, IN and ON

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    A play isn't usually on at a stadium. Plays are on at a theatre (theater in AmE). Perhaps you meant "the match" or "the game" if you were talking about sport. If that is the case, then you can use "at" or "in" with stadium.

    The bakery is in ABC Road (BrE).
    The bakery is on ABC Road (AmE).

    However, in BrE, we are starting to hear "on ABC Road" more often so it's not actually wrong in BrE.
    Yes, I meant some sport actually! Can ''going on at the stadium'' be used for the game then? Secondly, is there any particular rule for the use of the three prepositions (esp ON and AT)?

    Thank You!
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 07-Sep-2012 at 13:55. Reason: Deleting 'Sir'. emsr2d2 is a highly respected female teacher.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: AT, IN and ON

    Quote Originally Posted by Huda-M View Post
    Yes, I meant some sport actually! Can ''going on at the stadium'' be used for the game then? Secondly, is there any particular rule for the use of the three prepositions (esp ON and AT)?

    Thank you!
    With your stadium example, I would say something like:

    The football match is on at the stadium.
    The rugby match is being played at the stadium.
    The tennis match has started already. It's going on at the stadium right now.

    The "rule" with prepositions in English is that (annoyingly for learners) you just have to learn which one to use in all the different contexts. Here are some examples (which should prove that you can't just learn a rule):

    I'm on the bus.
    I'm on the train.
    I'm in the car.
    I'm on the plane. (BrE)
    I'm in the plane. (AmE)
    It's in the High Street.
    It's on the High Street.
    He is swimming in the river.
    He is sailing on the river.
    They are having a picnic at the river.
    They are having a picnic by the river.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Academic Writing's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: AT, IN and ON

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    With your stadium example, I would say something like:
    The "rule" with prepositions in English is that (annoyingly for learners) you just have to learn which one to use in all the different contexts. Here are some examples (which should prove that you can't just learn a rule)
    That's exactly how I tend to explain it emsr2d2. It's a bit unfortunate that there isn't an easier way, but I think it's the way that most students will learn the prepositions. As a learner of another language myself (Spanish), I wouldn't be too excited about memorizing every grammatical condition for every preposition and trying to process those while writing or speaking (and that would only get me so far anyway, as there are always exceptions). Personally, I find it less intimidating to learn the prepositions that fit with various verbs and phrases one by one. Over time I have noticed that my brain naturally extends a given usage to other similar verbs. That doesn't always work of course, but the mistakes are a necessary and often humorous part of learning. :)
    SeriousScholar.com

  6. Huda-M's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: AT, IN and ON

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    With your stadium example, I would say something like:

    The football match is on at the stadium.
    The rugby match is being played at the stadium.
    The tennis match has started already. It's going on at the stadium right now.

    The "rule" with prepositions in English is that (annoyingly for learners) you just have to learn which one to use in all the different contexts. Here are some examples (which should prove that you can't just learn a rule):

    I'm on the bus.
    I'm on the train.
    I'm in the car.
    I'm on the plane. (BrE)
    I'm in the plane. (AmE)
    It's in the High Street.
    It's on the High Street.
    He is swimming in the river.
    He is sailing on the river.
    They are having a picnic at the river.
    They are having a picnic by the river.

    Thank you, Ma'am :) I get it now :)

  7. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: AT, IN and ON

    Quote Originally Posted by Huda-M View Post
    Thank you, Ma'am :) I get it now :)
    I'm glad it helped. Just a note - there is no need to add an extra post to say thank you to anyone. You can just click the "Like" button on the posts which help. Also, there is no need for such salutations as "Sir/Madam/Ma'am" on this forum. Much as it's nice for someone to manage to get my sex right first time (!), being addressed as "Ma'am" makes me feel like either the Queen of England (no thank you) or an officer in the armed forces (no thank you again!)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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