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    #1

    in you come

    Hi.
    I found the following conversation at the book "101 American English Idioms":
    - That's it, Greg! You'd better not come in after midnight again tonight.
    - I know, dad. You don't have to jump down my throat! I told you that I'd make it home around 11:30. I don't intend to be late!
    - Well, you've said that before and in you come at 2:30 in the morning. You can't blame me for getting angry and scolding you. I've got good reason.
    Could anyone tell me what "in you come" means?
    Thank you very much!
    By the way, are there any mistakes in my post?

  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: in you come

    NOT A TEACHER

    It's related to "come in". The word order is inverted, but the meaning is the same. The father is saying to Greg that he came home at 2:30 AM.

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    #3

    Re: in you come

    Quote Originally Posted by Chicken Sandwich View Post
    NOT A TEACHER

    It's related to "come in". The word order is inverted, but the meaning is the same. The father is saying to Greg that he came home at 2:30 AM.
    What about "in you came", because it's a past action? Is it suitable?
    Last edited by khanhhung2512; 03-Sep-2012 at 03:22.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in you come

    The inversion is possible in any tense. Please don't use "words" like "cuz" in this forum.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: in you come

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    The inversion is possible in any tense.
    Which means "in you come" and "in you came" are both appropriate in the conversation above?

  3. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: in you come

    Quote Originally Posted by khanhhung2512 View Post
    Which means "in you come" and "in you came" are both appropriate in the conversation above?
    Hi,

    I would say no. The father is expressing a habit that Greg has, and which he presumes Greg will stick to tonight. So I'd go for the present, in this case.

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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