Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 1,458
    #1

    bring in/about new legislation

    Let's say I have the following sentence, 'Although the Government has introduced new legislation, the transport crisis is growing worse.' Now I have to complete the following sentence so that it has a similar meaning meaning to the previous sentence, but I have to use the boldfaced word.

    brought


    Although new legislation .... , the transport crisis is growing worse.

    My version: Although new legislation has been brought about, the transport crisis is growing worse.

    However, the answer key says: has been | brought in (by the government).

    Is my version also correct and natural?

    Thank you in advance.

    P.S. This question comes from Certificate of Proficiency in English, Past Examination Papers, June 2006.
    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 02-Sep-2012 at 23:47.

  2. SlickVic9000's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2011
    • Posts: 1,019
    #2

    Re: bring in/about new legislation

    (Not a Teacher)

    They both sound alright to me. I'm not sure either of the statements make it wholly clear whether the legislation has been ratified or not, though.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,822
    #3

    Re: bring in/about new legislation

    I would say that "new legislation has been brought in" means that the new legislation is now law.

    For me, "brought about" is closer to "caused by" or "as a result of". "The consideration of new legislation was brought about by the crisis in the transport industry".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 3,505
    #4

    Re: bring in/about new legislation

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I would say that "new legislation has been brought in" means that the new legislation is now law.

    For me, "brought about" is closer to "caused by" or "as a result of". "The consideration of new legislation was brought about by the crisis in the transport industry".
    Yes. With "brought about" I expect "by (something)" as in your "by the crisis etc."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #5

    Re: bring in/about new legislation

    The whole thing sounds unfamiliar to me. In the US if new legislation is introduced, that just means someone has placed legislation before the legislature. It doesn't mean that it has become a law.

Similar Threads

  1. law and legislation
    By Kazuki in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-Nov-2011, 23:43
  2. bring along - bring round
    By dilodi83 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 20-Sep-2011, 19:30
  3. bring, take and get
    By babygtelecom in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 14-Jul-2009, 11:25
  4. Bring Around
    By gx90t in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27-Dec-2007, 11:42
  5. bring along or bring back
    By sara98 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-Oct-2007, 15:42

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •