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    #1

    at / on the field and by the sea

    Hi there,

    I want to say the following:

    "You told me you want to stay ?at? the field (in this case a bigfield where children can play at? on?)"

    Thank you ;)

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: at / on the field and by the sea

    Quote Originally Posted by Prple View Post
    Hi there,

    I want to say the following:

    "You told me you want to stay ?at? the field (in this case a bigfield where children can play at? on?)"

    Thank you ;)
    I'm not sure why only children can play in a big field!

    You told me you want to stay in the field ...
    You told me you want to stay in the playground ...
    You told me you want to stay on the playing field ...

    (A big field where children can play.)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: at / on the field and by the sea

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I'm not sure why only children can play in a big field!

    You told me you want to stay in the field ...
    You told me you want to stay in the playground ...
    You told me you want to stay on the playing field ...

    (A big field where children can play.)
    In the limited context posted by Prple I think in AmE you would most often hear/use "at" for the first two, particularly for the following reasons. First, both the speaker and listener most likely know the field or name of the field ("at Penneypacker field) and second, "in" the field creates a mental picture (again, in AmE) of a person standing/playing in grass or vegitation. Maybe not so unusual, but to "stay" there would be. The third sentence is unusual with either "in" or "at", because in the U.S. a "playing field" is considered the official area where baseball, football etc. competition is held.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: at / on the field and by the sea

    Quote Originally Posted by billmcd View Post
    In the limited context posted by Prple I think in AmE you would most often hear/use "at" for the first two, particularly for the following reasons. First, both the speaker and listener most likely know the field or name of the field ("at Penneypacker field) and second, "in" the field creates a mental picture (again, in AmE) of a person standing/playing in grass or vegitation. Maybe not so unusual, but to "stay" there would be. The third sentence is unusual with either "in" or "at", because in the U.S. a "playing field" is considered the official area where baseball, football etc. competition is held.
    In the UK, a large grassy area attached to a school or college, where school sports might be played but are also simply used by all students during breaktimes and lunch breaks, is the "playing field".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #5

    Re: at / on the field and by the sea

    Of course grown ups can play in the field as well ;)
    Thanks!

    So I have to say: "Stay in the field, boys, until I am back!" for example?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by Prple; 08-Sep-2012 at 13:49.

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    #6

    Re: at / on the field and by the sea

    Quote Originally Posted by Prple View Post
    Of course grown ups can play in the field as well ;)
    Thanks!

    So I have to say: "stay in the field, boys! until I am back!" for example?

    Thanks!
    You can't put that exclamation mark in the middle of the sentence, only at the end, and it needs to begin with a capital letter, so you could say "Stay in the field, boys, until I get back!"
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7

    Re: at / on the field and by the sea

    Thank you! I have edited the post ;)

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