Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 5,226
    #1

    in time vs on time?

    I think "in time" is before the designated time(8) like "7:30 or 7:50", while "on time" is right at the designated time like "right at 8". But do you think there's little difference between the two?

    mo1-18
    M : Well, I took a quick shower, jumped into my clothes, and ran all the way to the school.
    W : Did you make it in time?
    M : Yeah, I got here right at 8 o’clock, but there was one problem.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: May 2012
    • Posts: 470
    #2

    Re: in time vs on time?

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I think "in time" is before the designated time(8) like "7:30 or 7:50", while "on time" is right at the designated time like "right at 8". But do you think there's little difference between the two?

    mo1-18
    M : Well, I took a quick shower, jumped into my clothes, and ran all the way to the school.
    W : Did you make it in time?
    M : Yeah, I got here right at 8 o’clock, but there was one problem.

    In time could mean he got their early. Definition - before a time limit expires)

    Definition of on time - According to schedule; punctual or punctually.


    In your context, you could use in time or on time. Personally I'd use on time, due to him arriving exactly at 8 o'clock (Which he planned)





    Not a teacher...Yet

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,830
    #3

    Re: in time vs on time?

    I'm very surprised that your excellent title thread has failed to elicit a lot of Similar Threads below. I know this topic has been discussed several times on the forum.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,158
    #4

    Re: in time vs on time?

    To me, 'in time' means early enough for another related event to occur successfully; 'on time' means according to schedule. Your plane may arrive on time, but you still may not land in time to board a connecting flight elsewhere in the terminal.

Similar Threads

  1. Apostrophe+s with weeks time, days time etc..
    By aachu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 28-Mar-2012, 18:49
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Oct-2010, 12:04
  3. [General] plenty of time/ample time/as if with some purpose/deliberately/
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23-Aug-2009, 04:48
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Apr-2009, 14:01
  5. Loss time VS Lost time
    By sudarawee in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 16-Oct-2008, 04:18

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •