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  1. sky3120's Avatar
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    #1

    "burn brighter"



    "We can burn brighter than the sun" in a song, "We are young".
    Here, the speech part of "brighter" is an adverb or an adjective? Or although it should be "more brightly", it is allowed in the song? Thank you so much as usual and have a good day.





    Last edited by sky3120; 12-Sep-2012 at 07:56.

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    #2

    Re: "burn brighter"

    The context might make a difference.

    Try using the phrases in sentences and we'll comment further.

    Rover

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    #3

    Re: "burn brighter"

    How did you do that?

    My post #2 was in reply to your question about 'Live happily'/'Live a happy life.'

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    #4

    Re: "burn brighter"

    Quote Originally Posted by sky3120 View Post


    "We can burn brighter than the sun" in a song, "We are young".
    Here, the speech part of "brighter" is an adverb or an adjective? Or although it should be "more brightly", it is allowed in the song? Thank you so much as usual and have a good day.





    'Brighter' is an adverb.

    Poets and song lyric writers break grammar rules all the time.

    Rover

  2. sky3120's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "burn brighter"

    I am sorry for revising the original question. I thought I already asked the same question before, although I am still confused, and thank you for the quick and clear answer.

    And if I could continue asking the same question about it, I would like to ask it again.

    We already know that whether prepositional phrases function as an adverb or an adjective, meanings can be the same.

    And I have known that "live a happy life" means the same as "live happily", but some people explain that there is some difference, referring to philosophical reasons and I sort of agree with it. However sometimes we can use it interchangeably, meaning the same. Don't you think so?


    For example,

    They lived a happy life in the end.

    The lived happily in the end.


    We can live a happy life there.

    We can live happily there.
    Last edited by sky3120; 12-Sep-2012 at 08:39.

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