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    #1

    those whose

    I read this sentence:
    In a 2006 op-ed by Terry O'Neill in the conservative Canadian news magazine, Western Standard, Chossudovsky was included on the list of "Canada's nuttiest professors, those whose absurdity stands head and shoulders above their colleagues.

    My question is, can the sentence still be correct without 'those'?

    Thank you!

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: those whose

    Quote Originally Posted by jasveron View Post
    I read this sentence:
    In a 2006 op-ed by Terry O'Neill in the conservative Canadian news magazine, Western Standard, Chossudovsky was included on the list of "Canada's nuttiest professors, those whose absurdity stands head and shoulders above their colleagues.

    My question is, can the sentence still be correct without 'those'?

    Thank you!
    I wouldn't omit it.

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    #3

    Re: those whose

    Quote Originally Posted by jasveron View Post
    I read this sentence:
    In a 2006 op-ed by Terry O'Neill in the conservative Canadian news magazine, Western Standard, Chossudovsky was included on the list of "Canada's nuttiest professors, those whose absurdity stands head and shoulders above their colleagues.

    My question is, can the sentence still be correct without 'those'?

    Thank you!
    I would omit 'those'

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: those whose

    IMO, ommiting it would create some ambiguity, since the reference for "whose" becomes less clear: does it refer to "Canada's nuttiest professors", or does it just refer back to "Chossudovsky"? I believe "those" is the key to understand that it referes to the former.

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. whitemoon's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: those whose

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    I believe "those" is the key to understand that it referes to the former.

    charliedeut
    Your explanation is reasonable. But I have a different opinion.
    According to your explanation, why didn’t the writer write like the following sentences?
    Chossudovsky whose absurdity stands head and shoulders above their colleagues was included on the list of "Canada's nuttiest professors.
    Chossudovsky, whose absurdity stands head and shoulders above their colleagues, was included on the list of "Canada's nuttiest professors.
    My idea is:
    One:
    “Those” explains the kind of people about Canada’s nuttiest professors.
    Canada’s nuttiest professors are those (the people) whose absurdity stands head and shoulders above their colleagues.
    Two:
    Chossudovsky is a name of a person, I think.
    If “those” refers to Chossudovsky, Chossudovsky (singular) and those (plural) is not in agreement as well as “their” in the phrase “their colleagues” is plural.
    If the writer refers to Chossudovsky, he has to use “the one whose…..” instead of “those” as well as “his” in their colleagues must be used instead of “their”.
    Therefore, “those” refers the kind of people about Canada’s nuttiest professors.
    Canada’s nuttiest professors are those (the people) whose absurdity stands head and shoulders above their colleagues.

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    #6

    Re: those whose

    I always think 'those' should be omitted because 'those' will make the sentence wrong in grammatical point. Moreover 'whose' normally refers to the antecedent "Canada's nuttiest professors", it hardly refers to 'Chossudovsky'.
    Last edited by cheer965; 12-Sep-2012 at 13:13. Reason: I change my idea.

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    #7

    Re: those whose

    In my idea, there is difference between two sentences without and with those.
    Without those, the sentence means beginning the new sentence:
    ….prosfessors. Their absurdity stands………………
    With those, the sentence means modifying professors in front of it as noun in apposition:
    …professors, those whose absurdity stands……..
    The writer had the second idea, I think.
    Last edited by whitemoon; 12-Sep-2012 at 13:37. Reason: add "of"

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    #8

    Re: those whose

    Quote Originally Posted by cheer965 View Post
    I always think 'those' should be omitted because 'those' will make the sentence wrong in grammatical point.
    No it won't.
    Moreover 'whose' normally refers to the antecedent "Canada's nuttiest professors", it hardly refers to 'Chossudovsky'.
    In an ideal world you are right. However, the world is not ideal, and misunderstanding is possible. The perfectly correct appositional 'those' helps remove all risk of ambiguity.

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    #9

    Re: those whose

    Quote Originally Posted by whitemoon View Post
    In my idea, there is difference between two sentences without and with those.
    Without those, the sentence means beginning the new sentence:
    ….prosfessors. Their absurdity stands………………
    With those, the sentence means modifying professors in front of it as noun in apposition:
    …professors, those whose absurdity stands……..
    The writer had the second idea, I think.
    Thanks a lot, I agree 'those' is an apposition

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