Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #1

    future tense+before+present perfect progresive

    "I'm not going to be able to memorize how academic degrees translate from Ukrainian into English before I've been doing it for sometime." Would it sound OK?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #2

    Re: future tense+before+present perfect progresive

    "Until," not "before."
    "Some time," not "sometime."

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #3

    Re: future tense+before+present perfect progresive

    "It'll be a while before we see another town." OR "It didn't take long before I had earned his trust" Would I need to use "until" for "before" in these sentences?
    Last edited by ostap77; 19-Sep-2012 at 12:48.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,590
    #4

    Re: future tense+before+present perfect progresive

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    "It'll be a while before we see another town." OR "It didn't take long before I had earned his trust" Would I need to use "until" for "before" in these sentences?
    What do you think? Perhaps more to the point; what have you found elsewhere?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #5

    Re: future tense+before+present perfect progresive

    Even more to the point - why do you insist on worrying about things that don't worry most native speakers? The purists among us will argue happily about whether 'before' or 'until' is the right choice in your examples. Most people will just use one or the other, and few will wonder whether it was the better choice.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #6

    Re: future tense+before+present perfect progresive

    5jj you've always been the best. These words go from the bottom of my heart. I guess I've been a pain in native speaker's butt lately. When you learn a foreign language you're constantly searching for the truth.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #7

    Re: future tense+before+present perfect progresive

    Quote Originally Posted by ostap77 View Post
    5jj you've always been the best.
    Ostap, you write some silly things at times, but that must count among the silliest. Until I stopped participating in threads started by you, I frequently expressed my impatience with you. In your heart, you probably think of me as the worst.
    I guess I've been a pain in native speaker's butt lately.
    What do you mean by 'lately'? you've been a pain in the proverbial for a long time, in my opinion.
    When you learn a foreign language you're constantly searching for the truth.
    OK, I'll be serious now. I have a certain sympathy with your search for the truth. I respect your rejection of glib responses - I have rejected glib responses throughout most of my life as a learner and teacher. BUT, and it's a big 'but': in your search for the truth, you allow yourself, I feel, to be led off into detailed questions of "Is it possible that in context A, given context B, utterance X might possibly be interpreted in this way?" You have an absolute right to ask such questions, but generally, they (or the responses) do not directly help you communicate effectively in English (In my opinion, I must add).

    Native speakers are rarely as precise in their use of language as grammar books seem to suggest. Lexicographers can do only their best to define a word in the way that native speakers are seen to use words. Grammarians can, similarly, only do their best to explain how native speakers are seen to put the words together. The most modern of many grammars on my shelves, Huddleston and Palmer's Cambridge Grammar of the English Language has 1764 pages, not including the Further Reading, References and indexes. As yet I possess only the first of four volumes of Declerck's Grammar of the English Verb Phrase - and that runs to757+ pages. And yet, despite the length (and weight!) of these works, much of what their authors write is opinion, not fact.

    The authors' opinions may well be more informed than mine (or anybody else's) but that does not mean that they are indisputably right. My personal feeling is that the more you try to pin people down to precise yes/no absolute answers, the less likely you are to recive absolutely right answers - there often aren't absolutely right answers. Language is the way in which people try to transfer ideas from one brain to another. It's a very effective way, but it is not absolutely perfect or logical, and it seems to have built-in fuzziness. Attempts to de-fuzz the fuzziness are, in my opinion, doomed. We can approach success in clearly though-out written work; in speech, many other factors clear things up. Trying to decide exactly what spoken, or informally written, words mean is not possible at the moment. Science may find a way to do this in the future, but we can't do it today
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 20-Sep-2012 at 08:52.

Similar Threads

  1. the present perfect progressive + the past progresive
    By ostap77 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Jan-2012, 23:24
  2. present perfect tense & present perfect continuous tense
    By *zaizai~love* in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 30-Oct-2008, 23:06
  3. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 10-Oct-2007, 20:23
  4. future progresive
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Sep-2007, 15:43
  5. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 14-Mar-2007, 16:13

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •