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    #1

    Post Unpopular As It is?

    news.yahoo.com/japan-takes-cautious-tone-dispute-increasingly-assertive-china-135414088.html

    "Though it doesn’t want to be seen as buckling under pressure from Beijing, the Democratic Party of Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda has little strength with which to face an angry China, unpopular as it is at home and facing a general election it is likely to lose."

    How is "unpopular as it is at home" different from "unpopular at home"?

  1. Academic Writing's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Unpopular As It is?

    Hi Cellular. Thank you for including the full story.

    The word it is necessary here and could refer to "the prime minister's stance" or "the Chinese response" or something similar. If we replace the pronouns with words, the sentence becomes clearer:

    "Though it doesn’t want to be seen as buckling under pressure from Beijing, the Democratic Party of Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda has little strength with which to face an angry China, unpopular as the Chinese protests are/the detached response is at home and facing a general election the party is likely to lose."

    At least, that is my interpretation after skimming the article.

    If we omit the word it, then the phrase unpopular at home would refer back to "an angry China," but the problem there is that the structure would fail as the sentence continues (that is, it would be poor if not incorrect to say "unpopular at home and facing a general election the party is likely to lose.").

    The sentence could have been written more clearly to begin with in my opinion, but I wanted to focus on the question. :)
    SeriousScholar.com

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Unpopular As It is?

    "Though it doesn’t want to be seen as buckling under pressure from Beijing, the Democratic Party of Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda has little strength with which to face an angry China, unpopular as it is at home and facing a general election it is likely to lose."
    All three its refer to the Democratic Party of Prime Minister Yoshiko Noda. None can be omitted without recasting the whole sentence.

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    #4

    Re: Unpopular As It is?

    I am thinking that "unpopular as it is at home" means "even though it is unpopular at home". But that does not seem okay in the story.

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    #5

    Re: Unpopular As It is?

    Quote Originally Posted by Cellular View Post
    I am thinking that "unpopular as it is at home" means "even though it is unpopular at home". But that does not seem okay in the story.
    It means more like "because it is so unpopular at home".

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