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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    moreover vs in short

    The answer for A is "in short", but I chose "moreover". The two are confusing, considering the previous context.
    What do you think?

    mo1-33
    Most people would say the weather in San Diego, California, is better than the weather in Fargo, North Dakota. Often, a person in San Diego will say, ďThe good thing about the weather is that you donít have to pay a thing for it. Itís free.Ē In one sense, he is correct. There is no weather market. Specifically, no one asks people in San Diego to pay a certain dollar amount for the weather on a given day.
    However, in another sense, he is incorrect. The fact is, people in San Diego pay indirectly for their good weather. How? To enjoy the weather in San Diego regularly,they have to live in San Diego ó they have to have housing.
    Without the good weather, living in San Diego would not be pleasurable and, therefore, the demand to live there would be lower. (A), the demand for housing in San Diego is higher because San Diego enjoys good weather.

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: moreover vs in short

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    The answer for A is "in short", but I chose "moreover". The two are confusing, considering the previous context.
    What do you think?

    Without the good weather, living in San Diego would not be pleasurable and, therefore, the demand to live there would be lower. (A), the demand for housing in San Diego is higher because San Diego enjoys good weather.
    Hi keannu,

    Look here (entry "phrase") and here for a definition of both possibilities. What the author is doing in the last sentence is to summarize the previous statement (in short), not introducing additional information to it (moreover).

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: moreover vs in short

    Thanks, but the sentence after "in short" doesn't have to be literally shorter than previous sentences, it should contain only core summary, right?

  4. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: moreover vs in short

    That would largely depend on the topic in question (some are more easily summarized than others), as well as on the writer's ability to summarize it. In this case, the topic has sort of been summarized twice, IMO: the first would be your undelined sentence; the second, as a closing summary, the one starting with "in short".
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #5

    Re: moreover vs in short

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Thanks, but the sentence after "in short" doesn't have to be literally shorter than previous sentences, it should contain only core summary, right?
    I suppose it should be, but normally wouldn't be counting the words. If it were much longer than the original, then it would look strange.

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