Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Malta
      • Current Location:
      • Romania

    • Join Date: Aug 2011
    • Posts: 341
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Accuse also a noun?

    Can 'accuse' be also a noun instead of 'accusation'?

    e.g. My accuse was communicated by the judge.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,278
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Accuse also a noun?

    Quote Originally Posted by allthewayanime View Post
    Can 'accuse' be also a noun instead of 'accusation'?

    e.g. My accuse was communicated by the judge.
    No.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,135
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Accuse also a noun?

    Quote Originally Posted by allthewayanime View Post
    e.g. My accuse was communicated by the judge.
    I have no idea what this might be intended to mean.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,035
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Accuse also a noun?

    Perhaps 'The judge told me what I had been accused of'..

    b

  4. charliedeut's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain

    • Join Date: Oct 2009
    • Posts: 5,560
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Accuse also a noun?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Perhaps 'The judge told me what I had been accused of'..

    b
    Wouldn't you know what you've been accused of before you are in front of the judge?
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  5. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,035
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: Accuse also a noun?

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    Wouldn't you know what you've been accused of before you are in front of the judge?
    That depends on where the court is. In the developed world, you would (with any luck...).

    b

  6. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,035
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: Accuse also a noun?

    Afterthought: Also, the court procedure might require it. I believe in some courts the judge starts the day by saying 'Prisoner at the bar, you are accused of <allegation>. How do you plead?' (the notion of a prisoner saying at the outset whether s/he is guilty or otherwise will be alien to people whose legal system is based on the Napoleonic Code.)

    b

Similar Threads

  1. accuse of ... because
    By navi tasan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-Aug-2012, 08:42
  2. [Grammar] to+infinitive+noun vs for+present participle+noun
    By Monique Gr. in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Nov-2008, 18:25
  3. Compound Noun or Descriptive Noun -- Show Possesive
    By bellb in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Oct-2007, 10:59
  4. accuse of X charge with
    By Lenka in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 16-Jan-2007, 15:05
  5. Is feature a countable noun or uncountable noun?
    By 3quarter in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-Aug-2004, 17:28

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •