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    #1

    bask in something

    I'd like to know some subtleties in meanings of this phrase


    dictionary.com says that


    1 to lie in or be exposed to a pleasant warmth: to bask in the sunshine.
    2 to enjoy a pleasant situation: He basked in royal favor.


    I have come across this combination.


    The dogs likes to bask in the grass and roll in it.

    1) Does it mean that it gets some pleasant warmth out of the grass?
    2) Is it always something pleasant? Is it possible to use it but without enjoying something?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: bask in something

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    I'd like to know some subtleties in meanings of this phrase


    dictionary.com says that


    1 to lie in or be exposed to a pleasant warmth: to bask in the sunshine.
    2 to enjoy a pleasant situation: He basked in royal favor.


    I have come across this combination.


    The dogs likes to bask in the grass and roll in it.

    1) Does it mean that it gets some pleasant warmth out of the grass?
    2) Is it always something pleasant? Is it possible to use it but without enjoying something?
    I have never come across "bask in the grass" and would go so far as to say that it is a misuse of "bask". Where did you find it?

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    #3

    Re: bask in something

    There are quite a few sources on the net: a tongue twister, on the http://uk.answers.yahoo.com and some others

    1) They just take laps around the swimming pool for exercise or just bask in the grass and roll in it.
    2) Bask in the grass with your beer until the fall rolls in, then head indoors and and park by the fireplpace to peruse the extensive wine list.
    3) This lightweight chair folds up flat for easy storage and can bask in the grass next to mom and dad or next to the Shade Pool for a quick getaway

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: bask in something

    I agree with bhaisahab that those are incorrect usages. You could lie in the grass, basking in the sunshine, but I certainly wouldn't use "bask in the grass".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: bask in something

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    There are quite a few sources on the net: ...
    Indeed.

    b

    PS I have a feeling that native speakers of Am Eng may be more accomodating with 'bask' collocations. COCA has 38 cases, including this: 'After refinancing their Tempe, Ariz. home, the Hardins bask in $200-amonth[sic] savings. '
    Last edited by BobK; 26-Sep-2012 at 11:33. Reason: PS added

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