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    #1

    get off the road

    A: Are you going to board it here?
    B: No, I' m not, I'm not going anywhere. I just got off the road yesterday.

    In a film I was watching I heard this expression I have never heard before and, although I caught the meaning, I'd been wondering if the meaning I caught is correct and in what type of sentences this phrase can be used.

    In this film a man has gone back home after being a marine for the American army and he has just walked in a dog kennel with his dog and a woman, the owner's kennel, is in front of him. She thinks he wants to board his dog, but he doesn't want to and B is what the man answers.
    Now, I think that "got off the board" means "to finish his mission as a marin". Am I right?
    In what kind of other sentence can this expression be used?

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    #2

    Re: get off the road

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    A: Are you going to board it here?
    B: No, I' m not, I'm not going anywhere. I just got off the road yesterday.

    In a film I was watching I heard this expression I have never heard before and, although I caught the meaning, I'd been wondering if the meaning I caught is correct and in what type of sentences this phrase can be used.

    In this film a man has gone back home after being a marine for the American army and he has just walked in a dog kennel with his dog and a woman, the owner's kennel, is in front of him. She thinks he wants to board his dog, but he doesn't want to and B is what the man answers.
    Now, I think that "got off the board" means "to finish his mission as a marin". Am I right?
    In what kind of other sentence can this expression be used?
    No, that is not the correct interpretation. The person had been traveling. He had been, as we say, on the road. Sometimes when people travel they either drive, ride a bus, or even walk on a road. Here, the person is saying that he is no longer traveling ("I'm not going anywhere").

    Secondly, a Marine is not a member of the Army. The Marine Corps is a separate part of the military. The United States Marine Corps is a military unit of the Department of the Navy. The Marine Corps engages enemies on the land while the Navy does the same on the water.

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    #3

    Re: get off the road

    Quote Originally Posted by Gillnetter View Post
    No, that is not the correct interpretation. The person had been traveling. He had been, as we say, on the road. Sometimes when people travel they either drive, ride a bus, or even walk on a road. Here, the person is saying that he is no longer traveling ("I'm not going anywhere").

    Secondly, a Marine is not a member of the Army. The Marine Corps is a separate part of the military. The United States Marine Corps is a military unit of the Department of the Navy. The Marine Corps engages enemies on the land while the Navy does the same on the water.
    Thank you very much Gill. You've been very clear. Can you give some examples of sentences where to use this expression, please? I'd like to learn how to use it in different kinds of contexts...

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    #4

    Re: get off the road

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Thank you very much Gill. You've been very clear. Can you give some examples of sentences where to use this expression, please? I'd like to learn how to use it in different kinds of contexts...
    It's not an idiom. It can be used to express the fact that you were traveling and are no longer doing so. There is nothing particularly interesting about it. It just means that you are no longer on the road. At the end of a long drive, you could say, "I just got off the road". This is merely a statement, like, "I just left the cafe", or, "I just got a new job".

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    #5

    Question Re: get off the road

    Hmm

    So what if we would like to say "I am not travelling right now. Just taking a rest for a while in the side of road" , what is the idiom for it?

    Sorry if it is talking about another word, but I am curious and it is still related..

    Thank you!

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    #6

    Re: get off the road

    Quote Originally Posted by AppleRome View Post
    Hmm

    So what if we would like to say "I am not travelling right now. Just taking a rest for a while in by the side of road" , what is the idiom for it?

    Sorry if it is talking about another word, but I am curious and it is still related..

    Thank you!
    None that I can think of that specifically refer to not traveling. The best I can do is something like, "I'm taking a break", or, "I'm stopping for the night". In the US, commercial drivers would say that they are out of hours. This means that they have driven for as many hours as they are legally allowed to drive.

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    #7

    Re: get off the road

    Ah.. "out of hours"

    Lovely idiom and good culture.

    Thank you, senior!

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