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  1. Ook Choi's Avatar
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    #1

    I cannot understand this sentence grammatically.!! please help me out.

    Hello teachers,

    I have been encountering the same grammar structure over and over. These are the examples.


    a classroom of students taking a math exam, a family gathered around a table sharing a meal, people quietly waiting their turn in a doctor's office--all are examples of the countless situations that have a familiar organization apart from any particular individual who has ever been part of them.


    are there any omissions before the types in red? such as who are ??
    People interact as specialists concerned with particular tasks, rather than as individuals concerned with one another as people.

    In this case, also "who are" has been left out?

    I can make a sense of the two sentences above, but I do not know why and how it works grammatically. Sometimes we use adjective after nouns, but when can I use it??

    please explain to me, and thank you for reading my inquiry.

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    #2

    Re: I cannot understand this sentence grammatically.!! please help me out.

    You're right. These are embedded clauses, specifically, relative clauses. If you could use a relative pronoun and a be verb/linking verb followed by present/past participles (which are ending in -ing or -en/-ed), then it would make more sense to you.

    The next time you see an extra verb (in -ing or -en/-ed ending), it probably means that there is an embedded clause. Then, if you see a noun before it, it could mean that it is a relative clause.

    I think they use reduced relative clauses (without overt relative pronouns) to easily state an idea without the need for repeating words or using unnecessary words.

    I can't think of many adjectives that can be used after a noun because typically adjectives come before nouns. The only adjective I can think of is "galore" that can come after nouns. For example, "In the festival, there will be competitions galore." You wouldn't normally say "*In the festival, there will be galore competitions." Thus, this position for adjectives is very rare. However, if you are considering relative clauses with adjectives, then this position is possible. For instance, "The boy quick to address the question was penalized by the quizmaster." (The boy who is quick to address the question was penalized by the quizmaster.)

    Hope that helps.
    Last edited by asdf1234; 03-Oct-2012 at 06:06.

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    #3

    Re: I cannot understand this sentence grammatically.!! please help me out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ook Choi View Post
    Hello teachers,

    I have been encountering the same grammar structure over and over. These are the examples.


    a classroom of students taking a math exam, a family gathered around a table sharing a meal, people quietly waiting their turn in a doctor's office--all are examples of the countless situations that have a familiar organization apart from any particular individual who has ever been part of them.


    are there any omissions before the types in red? such as who are ??
    People interact as specialists concerned with particular tasks, rather than as individuals concerned with one another as people.

    In this case, also "who are" has been left out?

    I can make a sense of the two sentences above, but I do not know why and how it works grammatically. Sometimes we use adjective after nouns, but when can I use it??

    please explain to me, and thank you for reading my inquiry.
    They are participle phrases, a.k.a. participial clauses or simply participials.

    Because it is often possible to insert 'who is/are...' etc. without changing the meaning, participials are commonly regarded as elliptical relative clauses. In fact, however, they constitute an independent subcategory of modifier, as is easily demonstrated by such examples as grammatical

    Anyone belonging to the communist party was under suspicion.

    which, if similarly expanded, would yield ungrammatical

    *Anyone who was belonging to the communist party was under suspicion.

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    #4

    Re: I cannot understand this sentence grammatically.!! please help me out.

    Ook Choi, a better title would have been Students taking a math exam.

    Extract from the Posting Guidelines:

    Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed. (Avoid phrases like "HELP!", "Urgent!", "translation please", "how do I say this", "I'm new" and similar expressions.)

    Rover

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