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  1. anhnha's Avatar
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    #1

    consisting of/consist of

    I would like to know why the wiriter use "consisting of" in the following sentence. Although I know it is correct but I feel confused.
    Early in the nineteenth century, however, the Peale family of Philadelphia established the still life, a picture consisting mainly of inanimate objects, as a valuable part of the artist's repertoire.
    As for me I think that "a picture" is subject, therefore I will use the verb "consist of". Can I use it?
    In this sentence "consisting" is gerund and mainly is adverb, right? This make me confused about which part of sentence
    the adverb refers to.
    Thank for help.




  2. SlickVic9000's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: consisting of/consist of

    (Not a Teacher)

    You could say "consisting" is a participle, and the phrase immediately following a "participial phrase" describing "the picture".
    If you so desire, you can replace "consisting" with "that consists of".

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    #3

    Re: consisting of/consist of

    I agree with Vic.

    The adverb 'mainly' modifies the phrasal verb 'consists of'.

    Rover

  3. anhnha's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: consisting of/consist of

    If you so desire, you can replace "consisting" with "that consists of".
    Is it really necessary to use "that" in the above phrase?
    Can I omit it without any difference in meaning?

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: consisting of/consist of

    Quote Originally Posted by anhnha View Post
    Is it really necessary to use "that" in the above phrase?
    Can I omit it without any difference in meaning?
    Yes, it is necessary. No, you can't omit it.

  5. anhnha's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: consisting of/consist of

    Yes, it is necessary. No, you can't omit it.
    Could you tell me the reasons for it?
    I don't see any problem about omitting "that" in the sentence.
    A picture consists of mainly of inanimate objects, as a valuable part of the artist's repertoire.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: consisting of/consist of

    Quote Originally Posted by anhnha View Post
    Could you tell me the reasons for it?
    I don't see any problem about omitting "that" in the sentence.
    A picture consists of mainly of inanimate objects, as a valuable part of the artist's repertoire.
    Yes, that would be a grammatical sentence on its own. But in the original sentence, it's a noun phrase, an appositive to "still life," and so you need a noun phrase to follow it, not a new, complete sentence.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. anhnha's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: consisting of/consist of

    Thank you!
    I am a bit confused, hope anyone help me.
    Can you tell me the following statement is right or wrong?
    1) Is "a picture consisting mainly of inanimate objects" in the original sentence an appositive noun?
    2) Is "a picture that consists mainly of inanimate objects" in the original sentence an appositive noun?
    3) Is "a picture consists mainly of inanimate objects" a complete sentence and it isn't an appositive noun?


  8. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: consisting of/consist of

    Quote Originally Posted by anhnha View Post
    Thank you!
    I am a bit confused, hope anyone help me.
    Can you tell me the following statement is right or wrong?
    1) Is "a picture consisting mainly of inanimate objects" in the original sentence an appositive noun?
    2) Is "a picture that consists mainly of inanimate objects" in the original sentence an appositive noun?
    Yes, these two can be appositives in your original sentence.
    3) Is "a picture consists mainly of inanimate objects" a complete sentence and it isn't an appositive noun?
    I agree with you.

    Hello, anhnha.

    1. "The Peale family of Philadelphia established the still life (= a picture consisting mainly of inanimate objects) as a valuable part of the artist's repertoire."

    It's not grammatical to put a full sentence "a picture consists mainly of inanimate objects." in the parentheses. 'a picture' is the subject, and 'consists' is the finite verb, and therefore it is a full/complete sentence.

    It is grammatical to put a noun/noun phrase (, not a full sentence), which is in apposition to 'the still life'. (as Barb pointed out)

    2. "a picture [consisting mainly of inanimate objects]"
    3. "a picture [that consists mainly of inanimate objects]"

    Those words in the brackets are postmodifiers. They (post)modify the noun 'a picture'.
    They (2. and 3.) are not full/complete sentences, and they can function as appositives.
    They fit well in the parentheses in the original sentence. (1.)

    I did my best to convince you...
    I hope you'll understand what I mean.
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 03-Oct-2012 at 17:22.

  9. anhnha's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: consisting of/consist of

    Hello tzfujimino,
    Thanks so much for helping me!
    After reading all posts of you and other teachers several times I totaly get it now.

    Good night and have a nice dream!

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