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    • Join Date: Nov 2004
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    #1

    piggyback & swash-buckler

    Both words are from Businessweek. Piggyback,
    Pig+back? I look up in the dictionnary and find
    its explanation is like a child sit on the
    shoulders of his father. In the context, I think
    it means emulate but not authorized. Am I right?

    For swash-buckler, in the context, I guess it
    means steal the show. Someone tends to show off.
    The passage where this word is from is talking
    about a leading scientist dare to challenge big
    Pharmceutical companies about the safety of the
    drug. And his mentor comments him: He is a swash-
    buckler.

    If convenient, could you give me another example
    about how to use piggyback? Thanks in advance.

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    #2

    Re: piggyback & swash-buckler

    If you piggyback, you use someone else's position, advantage, etc, to get something done. Here's a definition of a piggyback business:
    A "piggyback" business is one that supports the main business and becomes its own profit center (a business within a business). Many times the "piggyback" business becomes more profitable than the main business.
    http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~dst/Amway/Tea...usinesses.html
    You're right about swash-buckler.


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    #3

    Re: piggyback & swash-buckler

    Hi, thanks so much. You explain the piggyback business, though, I want to know only the single word "piggyback" 's meaning. I notice sometimes piggyback can be used as a verb. Can you explain a bit more? I'm sorry I think I am slow at learning a new word. Thanks again.

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    #4

    Re: piggyback & swash-buckler

    It can be a verb or a noun. It's first meaning is carrying someone on your back. It is used, therefore, when something smaller uses a bigger and more powerful thing as a means to achieve its goals. For instance, the British government is passing laws about terrorism at the moment, they can use this opprtun ity to add other bits of criminal aw, which would be piggybacking on the main part of the law, but would have other uses. they could, say, take the chance of pasing the terrorist laws to restrict some kinds of press reporting- this would be piggybacking.


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    #5

    Re: piggyback & swash-buckler

    Now I am fully understand. Thanks so much and have a nice weekend!

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