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  1. saddouda's Avatar
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    #1

    Grammar

    Hello ,
    1/What is more appropriate , AT the edge of .. , or ON the edge of .Or they are both used in different contexts ?

    2/I often hear native speakers using "is" with plural .that is something like " There IS two ways " ... , is this correct ? or is there a grammatical rule that allows this

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by saddouda View Post
    Hello ,
    1/What is more appropriate , AT the edge of .. , or ON the edge of .Or they are both used in different contexts ?

    2/I often hear native speakers using "is" with plural .that is something like " There IS two ways " ... , is this correct ? or is there a grammatical rule that allows this

    Please ask unrelated questions in separate threads.

    "There is two ways" is entirely ungrammatical and I'm very surprised that you hear this from native speakers.

    HOWEVER, the contracted form "There's" is often used before both singular and plural nouns in speech. The same person who would easily say "There's two ways we can go about this" would never say "There is two ways..." unless it was somethings like "This is... um... two ways..." where they changed the direction of their thought.

    In writing, don't use this contracted form.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Grammar

    NOT A TEACHER

    1. I just did a search in the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English and I was able to find example sentences with both.
    2. What you're (probably) hearing is "There's two ways..... " which is acceptable in spoken English. See also this response from 5jj:

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    It is not acceptable to say 'there is' followed by a plural noun. Many people do not object to the contracted form 'there's' followed by a plural noun.
    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 03-Oct-2012 at 21:15.

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    #4

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by saddouda View Post
    What is more appropriate: AT the edge of, or ON the edge of. Or they are both used in different contexts?


    They are both correct in different contexts.

    Don't leave a space before a comma, full stop or question mark.

    Tip for a better title: At/On the edge of.

    Extract from the Posting Guidelines:

    Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed. (Avoid phrases like "HELP!", "Urgent!", "translation please", "grammar", "how do I say this", "I'm new" and similar expressions.)

    Rover


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