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    #1

    What is the phrasal verb for "enjoy" ?

    Dear teachers,

    What is the phrasal verb for "enjoy" ?

    Is there phrasal verbs for "enjoy" ?

    Is "lap for" similar to "enjoy" ?

    Thanks

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: What is the phrasal verb for "enjoy" ?

    Quote Originally Posted by duiter View Post
    Dear teachers,

    What is the phrasal verb for "enjoy" ?

    Is there phrasal verbs for "enjoy" ?

    Is "lap for" similar to "enjoy" ?

    Thanks
    I can't think of a specific phrasal verb which I associate with "to enjoy". "Lap for" is not an English phrasal verb and it doesn't make sense. Where have you seen it?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: What is the phrasal verb for "enjoy" ?

    Quote Originally Posted by duiter View Post
    Is "lap for" similar to "enjoy" ?
    NOT A TEACHER

    Where did you find "lap for"? You can use "lap something ↔ up" in the appropriate context.
    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 06-Oct-2012 at 14:12.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: What is the phrasal verb for "enjoy" ?

    Quote Originally Posted by duiter View Post
    Dear teachers,

    What is the phrasal verb for "enjoy" ?

    Is there phrasal verbs for "enjoy" ?

    Is "lap for" similar to "enjoy" ?

    Thanks
    No, there is no phrasal verb with "enjoy". No, "lap for" is not similar to "enjoy" and "lap for" is not a phrasal verb.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: What is the phrasal verb for "enjoy" ?

    But if you have a really good time you can have yourself a ball. Not a phrasal verb by most definitions, but it's a multi-word idiom.

    b

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: What is the phrasal verb for "enjoy" ?

    You can "boogie on down" at a nightclub/disco. It means to dance but I guess you would probably be enjoying yourself. People are sometimes said to "get down" in the same way. Both those phrases are a little old-fashioned and are associated with the 1970s.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: What is the phrasal verb for "enjoy" ?

    There is a phrase "lap something up" but it is usually a slightly negative connotation to mean people were hearing/believing something with eagerness.

    "Can you believe the nonsense this guy is saying? Yet his audience is lapping it up. What a bunch of mindless drones."
    That doesn't mean "enjoy."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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