Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    #1

    cold tea/tea cold

    Is there a difference in meaning between

    1) I like to drink cold tea.
    2) I like to drink tea cold.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,868
    #2

    Re: cold tea/tea cold

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    Is there a difference in meaning between

    1) I like to drink cold tea.
    2) I like to drink tea cold.
    You can use both. They simply means that you like to drink cold tea instead of hot tea. You might mean iced tea or that you wait until your tea has gone cold.

    The second is certainly less common and I would expect to hear "I like to drink my tea cold" but the addition of "my" is not obligatory.

    I eat curry cold the next morning.
    He eats pork pies cold.
    They eat spaghetti bolognese cold.

    The outcome is the same - the food/drink is cold when it is consumed.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Belarus
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Feb 2011
    • Posts: 425
    #3

    Re: cold tea/tea cold

    Oh, I see. Isn't there a difference like in

    (1) Every visible star is named after a famous astronomer.
    (2) Every star visible is named after a famous astronomer.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,868
    #4

    Re: cold tea/tea cold

    Quote Originally Posted by Kotfor View Post
    Oh, I see. Isn't there a difference like in

    (1) Every visible star is named after a famous astronomer.
    (2) Every star visible is named after a famous astronomer.
    Not really, no. With those two examples, you are specifying a particular set of stars within a bigger set. With the examples about tea, both of them say that you are prepared to drink cold tea.

    The two sentences you posted originally would be used to answer two different questions:

    1) Q: What do you like to drink?
    A: I like to drink cold tea.

    2) Q: How do you like to drink tea?
    A: I like to drink tea cold.

    "Cold tea" behaves like a compound noun, if you like. "...tea cold" treats "tea" as a noun and then adds "cold" as supplementary information in the form of an adjective.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

Similar Threads

  1. 'I am cold' and 'I feel cold'
    By trueheart_205 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-Sep-2012, 15:37
  2. [Vocabulary] Your tea is getting cold
    By PENDSE in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Sep-2010, 21:24
  3. [General] eating a ravenous tea = devouring tea with ravenous appetite
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-May-2010, 10:10
  4. [General] To catch a cold. To have a cold.
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Oct-2008, 14:11
  5. [General] cold chisel, cold metal, cold steel, cold iron
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-Sep-2008, 11:47

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •