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  1. anhnha's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
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      • Vietnam
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    • Join Date: May 2012
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    #1

    to improving/to improve

    The development of human resources would be a breakthrough to improving the quality of tourism services.
    In the above sentence can I use "to improve" instead of "to improving"?
    The development of human resources would be a breakthrough to improve the quality of tourism services.
    Is there any difference in meaning between them?
    Thanks for help!


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    #2

    Re: to improving/to improve

    I think it would sound unnatural if you used either.
    Breakthrough, in this context, would collocate more naturally with "in".
    "The development of human resources would be a breakthrough in the quality of tourism services."

    I still think "breakthrough" is an unsuitable word to use here and better still would be:
    "The development of human resounces would be key to improving the quality of tourism services."

    That's the sentence I'd probably write anyway!

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