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  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #1

    a great deal of skill in contrast to / more skill than

    From Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English 2:
    Complete the second sentence so that it has a similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given.

    Chess is a much more skilful game than backgammon.

    Playing chess requires . . . . . . . . . playing backgammon. (deal)

    Would you accept, ‘Playing chess requires a great deal of skill in contrast to playing backgammon’?

    The book suggests, ‘Playing chess requires a great deal more skill than playing backgammon.

    Does my sentence convey the same meaning in your opinion or is there a subtle difference?

    Thank you in advance.

  2. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: a great deal of skill in contrast to / more skill than

    I would accept your sentence. However, there is a subtle difference, in that your sentence could be taken as implying that no skill is required to play backgammon; whereas the other sentences make clear that both games require skill to differing degrees.

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    #3

    Re: a great deal of skill in contrast to / more skill than

    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
    I would accept your sentence. However, there is a subtle difference, in that your sentence could be taken as implying that no skill is required to play backgammon; whereas the other sentences make clear that both games require skill to differing degrees.

    With the first sentence, I would just say it's implied little skill is used in Backgammon, not that no skill is required. By saying a 'great deal' it's stating more than an ordinary amount. That's my opinion on it. But yes, Chicken, both sentences could be used, The meaning in both is very similar.
    I'm not a teacher yet, but I am studying a Bachelor of Education with an English Literature major at Charles Sturt University, in NSW, Australia.

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    #4

    Re: a great deal of skill in contrast to / more skill than

    I think Grumpy has a point about it being possible to interpret is as saying that no skill is required, which is why the second sentence works better for me. It introduces some ambiguity about the skill IMO.

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