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    #1

    expressions I can't understand

    Hi,
    I'd like to know the meaning of the expression "really give it to him"
    in the dialogue:
    My advice was good
    Advice? More like orders!
    Let's go back to work. Really give it to him.


    What does "Hiaya mate" mean?


    What does the expression "You're on " mean?

    -How did you like the drums?
    -I have never played a better set. So easy even you could have played them.
    -Your' re on. How about playinng the guitar?


    I don't know wether I remember the dialogues properly because I didn't get them, but perhaps you've got an idea about those expressions anyway.
    Thanks Rip

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    #2

    Re: expressions I can't understand

    Hello Ripley

    1. Let's go back to work. Really give it to him.

    That depends on what the "work" is. If it's a boxing match, for instance, and you say to Boxer A, "really give it to him!", you mean "give Boxer B a thrashing".

    2. What does "Hiaya mate" mean?

    "Hiya" means "hello", and "mate" means "friend". It's an informal greeting in some dialects of English (British English, for instance, and Australian English). The "mate" doesn't have to be a real "friend": some people would say "hiya, mate!" to a stranger.

    3. What does the expression "You're on " mean?

    It usually means, "I agree to the course of action you have suggested".

    MrP

  1. #3

    Re: expressions I can't understand

    You also have to remember that depending on the country you live in expressions can change. For example, mate is a term used for friend, like Mr. P explained, but this term is not used in all native english speaking countries. In Canada and the US we use "buddy" as a term for friend, instead of mate. Expressions are tough to understand, don't worry some times an English and a Canadian won't be able to understand each other!

    Nick Dauphinee
    Study in Canada
    www.globerunner.ca

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    #4

    Re: expressions I can't understand

    Quote Originally Posted by MrPedantic
    Hello Ripley

    1. Let's go back to work. Really give it to him.

    That depends on what the "work" is. If it's a boxing match, for instance, and you say to Boxer A, "really give it to him!", you mean "give Boxer B a thrashing".

    3. What does the expression "You're on " mean?

    It usually means, "I agree to the course of action you have suggested".

    MrP
    Thank you, MrPedantic,
    1. the work is "recording a track......" What does it mean in this case?
    3. Does it mean "I agree with what you said"? I thought it meant "You are drunk" (!!!!!!!!!!! as to say you 're saying something stupid...)
    I was completly wrong, wasn't I?

    Bye. Rip

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    #5

    Re: expressions I can't understand

    Quote Originally Posted by Globerunner
    You also have to remember that depending on the country you live in expressions can change. For example, mate is a term used for friend, like Mr. P explained, but this term is not used in all native english speaking countries. In Canada and the US we use "buddy" as a term for friend, instead of mate. Expressions are tough to understand, don't worry some times an English and a Canadian won't be able to understand each other!

    Nick Dauphinee
    Study in Canada
    www.globerunner.ca
    Thank you Nick
    Rip

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    #6

    Re: expressions I can't understand

    Hello Rip

    In #1, in that case, it probably means "let's make every effort to do this well!"

    "You're on" usually means "I accept your challenge!" in British English. I've never heard it used with the sense "you're drunk".

    But there is the phrase "he must be on something"; which means "he is behaving so unusually that I suspect he is under the influence of narcotics".

    See you,
    MrP

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    #7

    Re: expressions I can't understand

    Dear MrP,
    I'm sorry, but I still have problems with those expressions. I've found the text, where I read the dialogue; maybe the exact words can help you help me... The expressions I don't understand are in capital letters.
    Thank you again

    The Beatles are recording a track....

    Brian: Oh boys, great work. That's a WRAP.
    John (to Ringo): So how do you like Pete's drums?
    Ringo: Never played a better SET, so EASY even you could play them
    John: YOU'RE ON - but how are you with a guitar?
    Ringo: Smashing, JUST EAT IT UP

    In another part of the text Paul tells about a village fete in Liverpool and says that he talked to John in the backstage, in the church hall
    BACKSTAGE? CHURCH HALL? I don't understand why the backstage has to do with a church. besides: what does church hall exactly mean?

    Rip

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    #8

    Re: expressions I can't understand

    Hello Rip

    Some of the slang is no longer used, so it's not surprising you found it confusing! I find it a little confusing myself. But here are my surmises. I'll mark the words and phrases that are now old-fashioned with an asterisk*:

    That's a WRAP*. ] "That is a very satisfactory piece of work, and it's finished now." (Cf. the slang expression "to wrap something up", which means "to complete something in a satisfactory way".)

    Never played a better SET ] A set of drums is a drumkit (an assemblage of percussion instruments). Thus Ringo means: "I have never used better drums".

    so EASY even you could play them] "The drums are so easy to play, that even you, John, who are a guitarist, could play them well."

    YOU'RE ON - but how are you with a guitar? ] The sense here is: "Ok, I accept your challenge: I will play the drums. But if I play drums, you have to play guitar. How good are you at playing a guitar?"

    Smashing, JUST EAT IT UP*] "Very good: I will play the guitar as easily as I would eat up some good food."

    CHURCH HALL] A building that belongs to a church. It has a large room, and maybe some smaller rooms, as well as toilet and kitchen facilities. It can be hired for social events, concerts, wedding receptions, etc.

    BACKSTAGE] Many church halls have a "stage", a raised area, on which plays or music can be performed. At the back of the raised area is another area, partly hidden from spectators, where actors can prepare to enter, sound or lighting equipment can be placed, etc. This is called "backstage".

    Let me know if it's still unclear!

    Bye
    MrP

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    #9

    Re: expressions I can't understand

    Thanks a lot! Now everything is clear!!!!!!
    Where are you from MrP?
    Rip

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    #10

    Re: expressions I can't understand

    Quote Originally Posted by ripley
    Thanks a lot! Now everything is clear!!!!!!
    Where are you from MrP?
    Rip
    Hello Rip

    I'm from southern England the London area. (Quite a long way from Liverpool.)

    Have a very cheery Thursday,

    MrP

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