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  1. learning54's Avatar
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    #1

    Could you consider their synonymity?

    Hi teachers,
    a) He got up early on Saturday morning.
    b) He got out of bed early on Saturday morning.

    a) He got dressed.
    b) He put the clothes on.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Could you consider their synonymity?

    Quote Originally Posted by learning54 View Post
    Hi teachers,
    a) He got up early on Saturday morning.
    b) He got out of bed early on Saturday morning.
    Both fine and they mean the same but a) is much more common.

    a) He got dressed.
    b) He put the his/some clothes on.
    With my correction, they mean the same.

    Thanks in advance.
    See above.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. learning54's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Could you consider their synonymity?

    Hi,
    Thank you very much once again for your help.

    L.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Could you consider their synonymity?

    I have just had one quick thought. An argument could be made for "He got out of bed early on Saturday morning" potentially being part of "He got out of bed early on Saturday morning, went to the bathroom, then went back to bed. He actually got up at midday".

    I am being a little pedantic because in most situations, you would be able to say "He got out of bed early ..." and most people would assume you meant that he got up.

    The term "to get up" does specifically mean getting out of bed and staying that way!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Could you consider their synonymity?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    ...

    The term "to get up" does specifically mean getting out of bed and staying that way!
    Exccept in the case of a counter-example to your first correction

    a) He got up early on Saturday morning.
    b) He got out of bed early on Saturday morning.
    Both fine and they mean the same but a) is much more common.
    ...
    If you said 'He got up early on Saturday morning [because there was only a mattress on the floor of the spare room, or because he couldn't get to sleep properly on the sofa, or because the cushions on the kitchen floor were uncomfortable...]' it doesn't mean the same as (b). You can 'get up' from somewhere other than a bed.

    b

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