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    #1

    adjective or adverb

    Dear teachers,

    Would you please tell me how you differenciate an adjective from an adverb ?

    "Drink this quick !" Is "quick" here an adverb ? Does it mean "quickly" ?
    When can you use "quick" as adjective and an adverb ?

    Same for :

    "I bought this car cheap" VS "I bought this car cheaply".

    Many thanks


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    #2

    Re: adjective or adverb

    Adjectives describe things. Adverbs describe actions.

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    #3

    Re: adjective or adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by hela View Post


    "Drink this quick !" Is "quick" here an adverb ? Does it mean "quickly" ?
    When can you use "quick" as adjective and an adverb ?



    "I bought this car cheap" VS "I bought this car cheaply".


    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,


    I am delighted to share some thoughts with you.

    1. I believe that learners should definitely say "Drink this quickly."

    a. "Quickly" is definitely an adverb. It tells us how to drink .

    b. But "quick" is also an adverb sometimes. Reportedly, even the great Shakespeare used it as an adverb.

    i. In 2012, however, most teachers seem to recommend that the adverb "quick" be limited to speech or

    informal writing.

    (a) If there's an accident, I think that most Americans would yell, "Call an ambulance quick!" (Of course,

    "quickly" would also be correct.)

    c. Also, please remember this: sometimes "quick" cannot be used:

    i. Every day, Tom quickly eats dinner and then rushes to the computer to click on usingenglish.com.

    (a) Native speakers will not accept: Tom quick eats dinner and ....


    *****


    2. I really liked your second question, for I was not sure myself. I checked my books and the Web. I think

    that the following is accurate.

    a. "I bought a car cheap" and "I bought a car cheaply" are both "correct."

    b. Again, we are told that "cheap" is sometimes an adverb, too.

    c. But my books assure me that when we are talking about buying and selling, it is more idiomatic to

    use "cheap." ( Idiomatic = the way in which most native speakers use their language.) I think that most

    Americans would say," I got this car cheap," instead of "cheaply."

    *****

    In summary:

    1. Please remember that an adverb usually modifies a verb ("adverb"): Come quickly.

    2. An adjective usually modifies a noun: a cheap suit/ a quick lunch.

    3. Sometimes, however, a word that looks like an adjective (quick, cheap, slow, etc.) can be used as an

    adverb in informal English but not used in front of a verb (Please see c. i. (a) above.)


    James

    My chief reference: Webster's Dictionary of English Usage (1989).
    Last edited by TheParser; 18-Oct-2012 at 14:55. Reason: vocabulary change

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    #4

    Re: adjective or adverb

    Thank you very much, James, for your answers.
    I understand, therefore, that the adverbs "quick" and "cheap" are used in spoken English and mainly American, right ?

    Regards

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    #5

    Re: adjective or adverb

    Quote Originally Posted by hela View Post
    Thank you very much, James, for your answers.
    I understand, therefore, that the adverbs "quick" and "cheap" are used in spoken English and mainly American, right ?

    Regards
    Not necessarily mainly American, no. In British English seaside resorts, there used to be a tradition of wearing silly hats with the phrase "Kiss me quick" on them. They never said "Kiss me quickly"!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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