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    #1

    's

    ... in front of the Wilson house
    ... gave to the Wilson children
    Why don't we have 's or s' in these two examples?
    Why don't we have the Wilson's house or the Wilsons' children?
    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: 's

    Why don't we have the Wilson's Wilsons' house or the Wilsons' children?
    You could.

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    #3

    Re: 's

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,


    What a fascinating question!

    1. We are going to a party at the Wilsons' house.

    2. The city plans to raze (demolish) the Wilson house.

    a. In No. 1 (I think) it means that we are going to the house currently occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Wilson.

    b. In No. 2, I cannot put my finger on it (I am not able to give a clear explanation), but it does not seem to be a

    matter of possession.

    i. Please study these two examples that I got on the Web:

    (a) "In 1899 Henrietta Fricht Wilson and her husband Frederick Wilson built the Wilson House on Swiss Avenue for their

    family." (Source: www. preservationdallas.com.)

    (b) "The Bachman Wilson house, in Millstone, New Jersey was originally designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1954 for Abraham Wilson and his first wife, Gloria." (source: en.wikipedia.org.)

    3. As you can see, there is a difference. Sadly, I am not able to articulate (explain) it. Hopefully, another member will do so.



    James

    P.S. In any case, please remember: In No. 1, it is Wilsons'-- not Wilson's. (On the Web, there was an article claiming that 50% of the teachers in country X did not know the difference. Surely, that cannot be true!)
    Last edited by TheParser; 22-Oct-2012 at 12:49.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: 's

    For me, it works for house, but not for children.

    The children of Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are themselves Wilsons. So they are the "the Wilson children" and part of "the Wilson family."

    The Wilsons' dogs, yes. The Wilsons' flowers, yes. But the Wilsons' children? I wouldn't use it.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. anhnha's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: 's

    Hello,
    In any case, please remember: In No. 1, it is Wilsons'-- not Wilson's. (On the Web, there was an article claiming that 50% of the teachers in country X did not know the difference. Surely, that cannot be true!)
    Could you tell me about the difference between them?

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    #6

    Re: 's

    Wilson's - of Wilson
    Wilsons' - of Wilson's.

    Mr Wilson's Children.
    Mr and Mrs Wilson's children.
    The Wilsons' children.

  4. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: 's

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    P.S. In any case, please remember: In No. 1, it is Wilsons'-- not Wilson's. (On the Web, there was an article claiming that 50% of the teachers in country X did not know the difference. Surely, that cannot be true!)
    I think that it could also be "Wilson's" if, for instance, only one Wilson actually managed to live there before it was (again, for instance) demolished due to technical defects in its building.

    And stop calling me Shirley!
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #8

    Re: 's

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    I think that it could also be "Wilson's" if, for instance, only one Wilson actually managed to live there before it was (again, for instance) demolished due to technical defects in its building.

    And stop calling me Shirley!
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello,
    Surely (oops!), I misread your post (I am a poor reader).

    You are not saying that the following sentence is "correct," are you?

    "The city plans to raze the Wilson's house."

    If only one Wilson owned the house, wouldn't you say:

    "The city plans to raze [Mr. / Mrs./ Ms.] Wilson's house."


    Thank you

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: 's

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello,
    Surely (oops!), I misread your post (I am a poor reader).

    You are not saying that the following sentence is "correct," are you?

    "The city plans to raze the Wilson's house."

    If only one Wilson owned the house, wouldn't you say:

    "The city plans to raze [Mr. / Mrs./ Ms.] Wilson's house."


    Thank you
    Absolutely. If there is only one person with that surname associated with that building, then you would call them "Mr Wilson" or "Ms/Miss/Mrs Wilson" (or use their first name too).

    We need to remember, going back to the original point, that "the Wilson children are the Wilson's children". That means "the children we are talking about, whose surname is Wilson, are the offspring of Mr and Mrs Wilson".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10

    Re: 's

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Hello,
    Surely (oops!), I misread your post (I am a poor reader).

    You are not saying that the following sentence is "correct," are you?

    "The city plans to raze the Wilson's house."

    If only one Wilson owned the house, wouldn't you say:

    "The city plans to raze [Mr. / Mrs./ Ms.] Wilson's house."


    Thank you
    No. I meant "The city plans to raze Wilson's house."

    Surely () that's correct? (I'm a poor writer sometimes, which is a problem for poor readers! )
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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