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Thread: 's

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    #11

    Re: 's

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    No. I meant "The city plans to raze Wilson's house."

    Surely () that's correct? (I'm a poor writer sometimes, which is a problem for poor readers! )
    In the same way that we might have said "The city plans to raze Hitler's house", yes. If the Mr/Ms/Miss/Mrs Wilson involved was commonly referred to as "Wilson" then I'm sure one might simply say "Wilson's house".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #12

    Re: 's

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    No. I meant "The city plans to raze Wilson's house."

    Surely () that's correct? (I'm a poor writer sometimes, which is a problem for poor readers! )
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Yes, without the "the," it is correct:

    The city plans to raze Shirley's house.

    James

    P.S. I hope that it doesn't raze James'/ James's house!

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    #13

    Re: 's

    Quote Originally Posted by TheParser View Post
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****

    Yes, without the "the," it is correct:

    The city plans to raze Shirley's house.

    James

    P.S. I hope that it doesn't raze James'/ James's house!
    Surely not! I heard its construction is really sound!
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

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    #14

    Re: 's

    Quote Originally Posted by anhnha View Post
    Hello,

    Could you tell me about the difference between them?
    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    Hello,

    No need to be embarrassed. I have been speaking only English for three-quarters of a century, and I still understand only a
    fraction of this magnificent language.

    In England, there is a newspaper called the Daily Mail. Millions of people love it, and millions, well, do not love it. In a recent

    article, it claimed that 50% of teachers could not punctuate this sentence correctly:

    "The Smiths' house is a disused windmill."

    (It did not tell us what the teachers "accidently" wrote. I guess they wrote Smith's.)

    *****

    If you are going to visit the house of Mr. and Mrs. Smith and their 3 children, you are, then, going to the house of the

    Smiths. Therefore, you are going to the Smiths' house.

    If you are going to visit the house of [Tom] Smith, you are, then, going to the house of [Tom] Smith. Therefore, you

    are going to [Tom] Smith's house.


    James

    P.S. The article is on Google. Just type "Half of teachers make simple apostrophe mistakes."

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    #15

    Re: 's

    Thank you TheParser,
    I like the way you explain grammar rules by using examples that are very easy to understand.

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    #16

    Re: 's

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    The Wilsons' dogs, yes. The Wilsons' flowers, yes. But the Wilsons' children? I wouldn't use it.
    Maybe it is a BrE thing, but I could use both for the children- I'd more likely use it without the apostrophe if focusing on the children and with if focusing on the parents.

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