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    #1

    with which to get prepared/to get prepared

    Are these sentences correct:

    1-He was given the textbook with which to get prepared for his exam.


    2-He was given the textbook, with which to get prepared for his exam.

    3-He was given the textbook, to get prepared for his exam.

    In "1" the clause is restrictive (the textbook he needed to get prepared for his exam).
    "2" and "3" are both meant to mean the same thing. In each case, the purpose clause is non-restrictive.

    It seems to me that in "3" the clause ("to get prepared for his exam") has been added as an afterthought, since there is no real need for a comma.

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

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    #2

    Re: with which to get prepared/to get prepared

    I'd use He was given the textbook to prepare for the/his exam.

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